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Deano3

Automatic service how often?

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I know, i know this topic has probably been discussed a million times but here we go, i now have a steinhart ocean one and a seiko 35, i am really wanting a seiko 033 and a 017 alpanist in my small collection and that is it no more as unnecessary , thats the plan anyway.

 

The 035 i just purchased said manufacture date was 2014 but told on forum would be fine with new syntheic oils used, but i must admit lately i have been thinking i dont want to buy all these stunning autos then in 5-10 years have to worry about getting all them serviced if costs £100s of pounds, unless get 1 a year done for a few year.

 

I am so tempted to buy the 033 and 017 soon so have the 3 great sarbs. I also love the automatics and love having a peice of mechanics on my wrist but just curious to see how often you get watches serviced ?

 

I have read so many people that dont get serviced at all as cannot justify the cost and say just buy a new movement and lots of people do but in my eyes surely better to look after the watch you have than replace.

 

Thanks dean

 

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My understanding is that it does depend on the amount of wrist time you give it. A daily wearer would be recommended to be serviced every 5 years (unless otherwise stated a la newer Rolex calibres), but if it were being worn maybe once a month, I have read you could extend to 10 years. It's also recommended to give them a little wind at least monthly as being sat dormant for long periods isn't particularly healthy. 

That being said, I also know people who get them done when they start noticing it running poorly so what do I know!?

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I wouldn't worry until it shows signs of needing a service. Seiko autos can run for 20 years without needing anything. If it goes wrong, buy another movement for about £40 :)

 

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7 hours ago, it'salivejim said:

I wouldn't worry until it shows signs of needing a service. Seiko autos can run for 20 years without needing anything. If it goes wrong, buy another movement for about £40 :)

 

I'd second this. Although I don't think I'll be bothering with a new movement.

 large.IMG_20161230_1226265_rewind.jpg.0d438a2fcb7678309470a5ba522f965f.jpg

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Personally if it's new and expensive and needs regular servicing due to a warranty then follow it as you would a car. Once out of warranty (or if the cost of the watch is low) then service as needed, i.e. when timekeeping goes out of spec.

There are a lot of myths around servicing, keeping the watch running or keeping it stopped (if it's in rotation that is) and the like. 

 

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Personally, I'd only service once I notice a loss of timekeeping or something else that needs attention.

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Just sent my sons Omega off for service it’s loosing time,last service was seven years back.

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Thanks for replys everyone, so the seiko will be fine for another 5 year or so then i may think about service but no rush.

Trouble with me is i dont wear a watch at work for my 4 days then i have 4 days off and usually wear my steinhart or gshock but the seiko will only be worn for certain occasions so maybe once a month if that.

So i never really notice time loss as only wear occasionally and only my days off.

Think in future i may get the most worn one serviced and the others maybe, depending but soppose if only costs £100-150 if lats 10 years cant complain.

Really want full sarb collection wife probably won't be so keen

Dean

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Not serviced my PO since 2012, had my Aquaterra from new since 2014,Tag Aquaracer since around 2012 and a few others since then and they all run absolutely fine. I only wear them a few times a month each or maybe for a week at a time then back in the safe for a few months! I am aware I'm playing a dangerous game but really have not had the money for servicing owing to house moves and new family.. Will definitely be sending them off for services in the foreseeable though.

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I've recently come to terms with this very unfortunate side effect of opening automatic watches.

There are two different schools of thought here. Either your a preventative type, or a fix it when it breaks type. Many an automatic have give more than a decade without servicing, before crapping the bed. Should you wait until something breaks? I don't know, each case is different. I mean, when it breaks it costs you more, however being preventive almost always means you're spending money on an expensive service more frequently.

Frankly, I think it's better to wear it till stops working. Then you can decide if it's worth the money to fix. For the watches your talking about, I'd not spend money on services. To replace the movements is super reasonable. My only advice is to stay away from automatic chronographs... They cost an arm and a leg and your first born to work on. Lol

Lower Jewel count is cheaper. Lesser complications are cheaper also. If you stick to simple and reasonably priced watches, then I say don't waste your time or money on servicing.

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I've had my oldest auto since 1994. It has just had its second service  --  as a precautionary measure; it was beginning not to fully charge on the wrist.

There's a lot of "ker-ching" (that's onomatopoeic you know :wacko: ) involved with servicing ("we recommend you let us clean up the case", "we noticed that the crystal had a tiny crack, so we replaced it" (neither I nor the AD had noticed), "we strongly recommend a new strap, Sir").  --  I wait until the function is impaired in some way.

 

Edited by yokel
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Funny old world sometimes. I own a pocket watch bought in 1919 by my great grandad. It's never been serviced in 100 years and still winds and keeps time.  A Seiko 5 I had lasted 15 years before it lost so much time I had it serviced.  My rule of thumb is don't try and fix what isn't broken... 

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3 hours ago, it'salivejim said:

I wouldn't worry until it shows signs of needing a service. Seiko autos can run for 20 years without needing anything. If it goes wrong, buy another movement for about £40 :)

 

This makes sense to me..

14 minutes ago, ong said:

Funny old world sometimes. I own a pocket watch bought in 1919 by my great grandad. It's never been serviced in 100 years and still winds and keeps time.  A Seiko 5 I had lasted 15 years before it lost so much time I had it serviced.  My rule of thumb is don't try and fix what isn't broken... 

I've often wondered if servicing is a modern phenomenon. My Dad would never dream of having a watched serviced, but then he always set his watch every day 5 minutes fast, think it was an army thing.

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37 minutes ago, Autonomous said:

This makes sense to me..

I've often wondered if servicing is a modern phenomenon. My Dad would never dream of having a watched serviced, but then he always set his watch every day 5 minutes fast, think it was an army thing.

Same here.  I vaguely recall this being part of the mechanical watch renaissance in the late 90s. My Dad never had a watch serviced.  He had over 50 and they all still worked well when he passed away in 2009.

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It also depends how you wear your watches, do you wear it every day or use it for diving or work in a dirty environment? If not then a five year service probably isn't necessary.

My personal opinion is a service every 7 to 10 years depending on the watch, some cheaper models I probably would never service 

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5 years, before if its starts to lose or gain or the date does not flip on time, like any machine it needs lubrication, if there isn't any then those little gears are metal to metal and they will wear. 5 years max. 

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Breitlings that are worn daily ( or frequently ) seem to start loosing accuracy around the 7-ish years mark. So always serviced mine about then.... always money well spent as the full service includes the case full restoration.. Omegas seem to last longer than that.... Seiko watches from my mate's experiences often go a decade or more before there is any noticeable accuracy loss.

 

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