Jump to content
  • Sign Up to reply and join the friendliest Watch Forum on the web. Stick around, get to 50 posts and gain access to your full profile and additional features such as a personal messaging system, chat room and the sales forum PLUS the chance to enter our regular giveaways.
Sign in to follow this  
spinynorman

1925 B & Co Movement

Recommended Posts

I've posted before about my 1925 Sir John Bennett Ltd gold wristwatch. It had to have a new crown and stem, at which time the jeweller told me it was a Longines movement. Last night the crown came out, which may be a job for @simon2 (separate email), but it motivated me to open the back up and have a look.

The movement is signed B & Co with "o" underlined and three stars. According to Mikrolisk that is "Baume & Merciers / Baume & Co. / Baume Freres". They list 3 registrations - Hatton Garden 1878,  Les Bois, Genf, Schweiz 1880 and again 1901. Hard to tell from their drawings of the stamps which one it would be.

So, is that not Longines after all? Anyone know what "13,34" refers to?

DSC_9044crop

And then the case, 9ct gold, Birmingham assay, made by Dennisons.

DSC_9050sDSC_9044s

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The 13.34 movement is a Longines movement and the B&Co stands for Baume & Co who were Longines agents in UK, Dennison as you probably know was a case manufacturer.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
27 minutes ago, JoT said:

The 13.34 movement is a Longines movement and the B&Co stands for Baume & Co who were Longines agents in UK, Dennison as you probably know was a case manufacturer.

Thanks, that explains the movement. I have another Dennison cased watch from the 1950s, so, yes, I had come across them before.

Just found this on http://www.vintage-watches-collection.com/watch/longines/longines-silver-officers-with-hinged-lugs-and-benson-dial-1918/

Quote

The 13.34 is one of the most difficult early Longines movements for the collector to find, it being also one of the company’s first calibres designed specifically for the wristwatch in 1910 and almost all examples now reside in private collections from whence they are unlikely to reappear in the foreseeable future. This is a 15 jewelled level calibre and is one of the most visually attractive early Longines movements.

Which seems a bit at odds with http://www.vintagewatchstraps.com/longines.php#longines1334

Quote

The lowest grade 13.34 movements imported by Baume had 15 jewels.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The 13.34 and 13.34ZZ are certainly not as rare as the sales site implies

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, JoT said:

The 13.34 and 13.34ZZ are certainly not as rare as the sales site implies

Yes, that whole page seems to be gushing, like the author used to be an estate agent, or work in the advertising department of the Franklin Mint.

  • Haha 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...