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antonywright

Non working clock barrel mechanism

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Trying to restart a bespoke clock for my M-I-L, presented to my (now deceased) F-I-L. 

Still working out how to attach photos from smartphone (contradiction there!), mechanism is a brass 90cm barrel, no clear maker/mechanism marks but with 2 winders on face, plus striker/bell on rear. 

If over wound then how can I release tension, will the problem persist even if less wound? Putting text up now and will attach photos asap (once know how!) 

Suspect over-wound by him some time ago, as without overly forcing, I can't wind either spring any more. 

Checked if any form of releasable  'lock' was stopping spring from unwinding but unable to see any restraint mechanism. 

Googled but unable to find anything that identifies the mechanism or applicable instructions. 

Any suggestions on how to get it working much appreciated, I presume a 7 day movement with quarter hour chimes?

Many thanks, Tony

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This is a French 8 Day striking movement. Striking the Hours and once on the half hour. I think you mean a 19mm Diameter barrel. If you remove the dial and Brass bezel, then you will see the Click and Ratchet wheels. fit the winding key to the winding arbor and reverse the ratchet wheel ( very slightly, whilst holding the key firmly) Gently release the click and allow the ratchet wheel to rotate a few teeth. then release the click and ensure it drops back into the ratchet wheel teeth. Continue until there is no more tension on the spring. The main reason that this clock has stopped is because it is dry( no oil) and dirty. Releasing the tension on the springs  will not make the clock work. The springs may well have become "Set" and will need replacing. For the clock to run a full 8 Days. After it has been cleaned.

Hope this helps. Regards Simon.

Shout if you need further advice.

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Simon, many thanks for this informative response, away currently but once back  at w/e, will see if I can achieve your suggestions. 

Would spray oiling with light machine oil (not wd40 or similar) help?

Regards, Tony 

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No, no, no. For the clock to perform properly, it must be disassembled and thoroughly cleaned. Mainsprings removed and checked, for there condition and strength.  The list goes on. But if you want this clock to reward you with good timekeeping and many years of reliability. Do the job once and properly and you will be extremely please with the results.. I'm here if you need advice.

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Thank you for responses, a curiously wrought clock which we anticipate depositing to a place of safety, for all to admire.

I hear what you say, clearly beyond my abilities therefore will need to involve a specialist restoration service. 

We live in the Bedfordshire/ Northamptonshire area. Does this forum have suggestions of any nearby good "value for money" specialists?

Would you also hazard a guess at the likely cost range. 

Many thanks, Tony

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Simon / All,

Having decided this work needs more knowledgeable and competent skills than I currently possess, and the restoration/donation is an important act of remembrance to a lovely man,   I have found a specialist repair shop (Oundle Clock Shop) in Cambridgeshire that I will get to assess the work. Are they known on here for quality of work?

Any pointers or suggestions on what I should be expecting them to do and how long that would help me gauge their competency. 

Many thanks. Tony

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Also, given need to transport to final London destination, any suggestions on HOW to best do so to avoid any further mechanism stress, presume unwound, but apart from that? Thanks

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i would double box it and pay extra attention to the balance at the top which is particularly fragile and vunerable

The clock itself looks very clean, which makes me think / wonder if it was serviced in the last ten years or so? I have one to service and the movement is black as your hat!! :laugh:

These french movements are extremely well made, some can run upto 10 days on one winding. There is also a year going version that has 6 mainspring barrels, it probably takes a month to wind the thing up! But an excellent piece of craftsmanship! 

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