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RWP

Let’s Settle it.....terms.

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Throughout my time on TWF what I call butterfly clasps have been variously called DEPLOYANT or DEPLOYMENT clasps.

There was a time when deployment was seen as a newbie error but I have noticed site after site coming up with deployment as a description, to the point I am thoroughly confused.

Which do you use or like me do you feel happy with both. :yes:

 

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Cheers :thumbsup:

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that is a " deployant" Clasp. For leather straps. The "Butterfly" type is for metal Bracelets.

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deployment is how you arrange forces on the field of battle

deployent is a the thing on the watch

 

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11 minutes ago, simon2 said:

that is a " deployant" Clasp. For leather straps. The "Butterfly" type is for metal Bracelets.

This ^ is the correct answer :yes:

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11 minutes ago, simon2 said:

some say "mant". some say "ment".

Or “ Yant or Yent” :whistle:

Edited by RWP

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30 minutes ago, RWP said:

so they got it wrong.  Most UK jewellers use 9ct when describing gold fineness, but k or kt is correct

A carat is a unit of weight for diamonds and other gemstones. One carat equals 200 milligrams (0.200 grams). ... A karat, when used with gold, is a unit of purity-- 24-karat gold is pure gold, but usually you mix gold with a metal like copper or silver to make jewelry (because pure gold is too soft).

 

It is a case in point when things that are so commonly wrong that they just about become right.  There will be about 10 times more 9ct gold watches listed on eBay than the correct 9k.  If I was selling on there I would use both 9k and 9ct in the description - i'd hate to leave out the ill informed. :tongue:

 

And it is a deployant clasp

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Deployant means folding or something in French... because this is similar to an English word with an M then numpties get it wrong...

Typed this before my connection dropped and I see someone got thete first.

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It’s forrin innit!

I know that speaking forrin is out of fashion at the moment, but we should be above that sort of thing.

”Deployant” (or, at a pinch, “Faltschließe”).

 

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I refuse to speak French.......ever since Crecy.

How about  slidy watch thingy ?

You know it makes sense. :angry:

 

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1 minute ago, RWP said:

I refuse to speak French.......ever since Crecy.

How about  slidy watch thingy ?

You know it makes sense. :angry:

 

Come March 29th 2019, it will be an arrestable offence to use the word 'deployant'. :laugh:

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I love these linguistic “false friends”. Probably the best I know is “dandelion”, which you might think is derived from the French “dent de lion” (lion tooth)  —  particularly as the German is ”Löwenzahn” (also lion tooth). But the French for dandelion is “pissenlit” (I’ll let you translate that!)

 

 

6 minutes ago, RWP said:

I refuse to speak French.......ever since Crecy:angry:

 

Oi, we won Crécy.

Though, in best British “if it was good enough for my grandfather” tradition, it did lead us to cling to the idea that the longbow was a wonder weapon for generations after it was superseded.

 

 

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9 minutes ago, wrenny1969 said:

I prefer the Japanese version it's easier to remember デプロワイヤント

:biggrin:  That’s all Katakana, so presumably a transliteration of “deproyant” :yes:

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30 minutes ago, yokel said:

I love these linguistic “false friends”. Probably the best I know is “dandelion”, which you might think is derived from the French “dent de lion” (lion tooth)  —  particularly as the German is ”Löwenzahn” (also lion tooth). But the French for dandelion is “pissenlit” (I’ll let you translate that!)

 

 

Oi, we won Crécy.

Though, in best British “if it was good enough for my grandfather” tradition, it did lead us to cling to the idea that the longbow was a wonder weapon for generations after it was superseded.

 

 

They were  right, had Wellington used the Long Bow in the Peninsular wars they would have been as effective as the muskets of the time.

As to Crecy the French should have done what they usually do......surrender :whistle:

Edited by RWP
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Linguist's perspective.

"Deployment" has become correct through use. It is, however, a malapropism.

"Deployment" is a verbal noun; we say "THE deployment of troops" etc.
"Déployant(e)" is the present participle used adjectivally. "Une boucle déployante" is the French expression, literally meaning "an unfolding buckle" in the sense of "a buckle that unfolds".
"Le déploiement" has a very similar meaning to the English "deployment"; unsurprisingly, as the English is derived from it.
I am happy to be proved wrong, but I believe that no French speaker would say "une boucle déploiement".

It would be much simpler were we to call it, in plain English, a folding clasp. It's interesting also to note that the French think of it as "unfolding", whereas we would automatically think the reverse in English.

I fully accept that it will be called a deployment clasp, though I will never refer to it as such, and it will continue to jar with me a little because it is grammatically incorrect in its language of origin. Or perhaps one should say "mal à propos", hence my use of the term "malapropism". Technically, it is what we refer to as a cross-linguistic malapropism.

 However, does anyone really mind? No, and I think it is perfectly reasonable for anyone who doesn’t have a degree or at least considerable proficiency in French not to know that.  So carry on deploying by all means. You’re wrong, but you’re forgiven. 

Edited by AVO
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Aside from the whole "deployant/deployment" thing, I was under the impression that a "butterfly clasp" was different again and opened out both directions from the centre rather than a standard deployant from one end.

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I was guilty of saying deployment in the beginning, but to me it is deployant.  I have noticed supposed watch sellers stating them as deployment though.  :king:

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Apparently;

 "A buckle that fastens to the watch strap and opens and fastens using hinged extenders. Invented by Louis Cartier in 1910. Adeployant buckle is easier to put on and remove than a strap.Deployant comes from the verb "deployer" which means to unfold. Sometimes mistakenly referred to as a "deployment" clasp. "

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