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The wife's Peugeot 308CC needs a new set of four tyres...225/40R18  92Y. While we don't really need to go for uber expensive Dunlops, or Pirellis, we also don't want some cheapo Nangchong 'Ditchfinder 2000s'. The Goodyears that I bought 18 months ago all look like racing slicks now so I won't be getting any of them again. Have been looking at Avons on Black Circles.com and they seem pretty reasonable at £79 a pop, with a £20 discount if you buy 4. Any other suggestions?

https://www.blackcircles.com/catalogue/avon/zv7/225/40/R18/W/92/f?tyre=34751985

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I went for the same size on my old Merc, no point in tyres worth more than the car so went for the cheapo ditchfinders. 

With the traction controls off in the wet it's just plain dangerous 

:laugh: :laugh:

 

 

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Bridgestones have done me right for many years. I’ve even take them to the track for some aggressive traction control, and they still outlasted their warranty.  Hankooks are popular, too. I swore off on Goodyear for good, I think the ones that came on my Jeep were crap. 

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Hancock and evergreen seem to be a popular brand in my Peugeot garage 

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Our tyres seem to have been going on for ever. They are still the ones that came with the new Suzuki and have lasted since March 2013. Unfortunately, Kris doesn't know what they are. They are certainly black and round, and are not low profile. Seriously though, I just wondered - is it true that larger diameter wheels and ordinary rather than low profile tyres are better and more comfortable over rough and potholed surfaces?:)

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Before I've finished reading your post NO No No avoid Avon they are rubbish mate .Had potenza's on my skyline got Avon after them nearly lost it because of them .

Edit ..If your looking for budget tyres get the best you can .I'v got Dunlop on my 350z right now good for the cash mate .

Edited by A2orry
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5 minutes ago, deano1956 said:

Uniroyal either rain sport or rain expert, not just for rain !

deano 

Never had them but have heard loads of good comments. 

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10 minutes ago, A2orry said:

Before I've finished reading your post NO No No avoid Avon they are rubbish mate .Had potenza's on my skyline got Avon after them nearly lost it because of them .

I was looking at them as they had good reviews, and to be honest, the missus doesn't drive like Emmerson Fitipaldi. Perhaps just not the right thing on a Skyline which obviously has more poke than her little 2litre diesel.....?

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One quick tip, when you buy ask them what the treadwear rating is. 

As a rough rule of thumb the lower the number will last less time but be a bit more grippy, higher the number and a bit more tread depth but harder rubber and last a bit longer. 

tire-drawing.jpg

 

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 I have a garage mate .If your wife is the main driver low speed low milege have a look at barum or nankang .

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I find it’s not so much the make of tyre that you need to worry about, rather what you fill them with. I use a special blend of 78.09% nitrogen, 20.95% oxygen, 0.93% argon, 0.04% carbon dioxide, and small amounts of other gases. I've been using it for years and it’s never let me down as long as it’s at the correct pressure. :thumbsup:

Edited by Steve D UK
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@Steve D UK I know you are joking, but when I was on the racecars we did use nitrogen (100%) because it is less prone to pressure change due to temperature. 

On tyres, I got all season tyres.  I drive an old mans car like an old lady so don't need massive corner grip, and the winter tyres are so much better in snow and rain for braking.  I used to swap for full winter tyres, now I have no need to do that.

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You could always ask your local Kwikfit fitter :whistle::russian_roulette:

Edited by mel

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19 hours ago, BondandBigM said:

One quick tip, when you buy ask them what the treadwear rating is. 

As a rough rule of thumb the lower the number will last less time but be a bit more grippy, higher the number and a bit more tread depth but harder rubber and last a bit longer. 

tire-drawing.jpg

 

  now days,  the most important data is "made in china" ?

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Kumho Ecsta get good reviews and are not too expensive.

I've got Goodyear Efficient Grip Performance all round and they seem to do the job well – lasted 18 months so far but I only do about 7k a year.

Autoexpress Top 10 review here:

http://www.autoexpress.co.uk/accessories-tyres/91856/tyre-reviews-best-car-tyres

 

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Decent tyre, reasonable price have a look at Maxxis unless you do stupid stuff they are fine, no quibble warranty also.

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6 hours ago, mel said:

You could always ask your local Kwikfit fitter :whistle::russian_roulette:

funny that mel, I just watched this watchdog video today about quick fit ! and all you need is air in the tyre for road use so say the AA :biggrin:

deano

 

 

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Another vote for Bridgestone Potenza Touring, that's the tyre class recommended for my Honda CL9 (US: Acura TSX 2006), have used for years (on my second set). 

I inflate mine about 10% above spec for better traction (a law enforcement, and track, trick), less "cushy" ride. E.g. Honda recommends 32/30 psi front and rear, I do 34/32 or 34 all around. I would go spec inflation in wet weather. I've had great luck with the nitrogen mix that Costco uses, hardly ever have to add air. (If you have a Costco nearby, in the States they offer free rotation and balancing service for the life of the tire while membership is current, also refund percentage of the tire's sale price if one or more don't last through the warranty. They do the same for vehicle batteries.) 

Probably don't need to say this, but don't try to economize by using a lesser variety of tyre than the vehicle manufacturer dictates. Speed and heat ratings as well as tread profile will support the car's traction control, performance characteristics. I've seen people blanch at the price of touring tyres and try to buy "budget" types and have to be talked out of it. :rolleyes: 

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3 hours ago, Chromejob said:

Another vote for Bridgestone Potenza Touring, that's the tyre class recommended for my Honda CL9 (US: Acura TSX 2006), have used for years (on my second set). 

I inflate mine about 10% above spec for better traction (a law enforcement, and track, trick), less "cushy" ride. E.g. Honda recommends 32/30 psi front and rear, I do 34/32 or 34 all around. I would go spec inflation in wet weather. I've had great luck with the nitrogen mix that Costco uses, hardly ever have to add air. (If you have a Costco nearby, in the States they offer free rotation and balancing service for the life of the tire while membership is current, also refund percentage of the tire's sale price if one or more don't last through the warranty. They do the same for vehicle batteries.) 

Probably don't need to say this, but don't try to economize by using a lesser variety of tyre than the vehicle manufacturer dictates. Speed and heat ratings as well as tread profile will support the car's traction control, performance characteristics. I've seen people blanch at the price of touring tyres and try to buy "budget" types and have to be talked out of it. :rolleyes: 

Well written chromejob. Gather you like rice rockets too.dealer recommendations for tyres and pressure as you say can be played with a bit .recommended pressure for my 350 is 35 all round .I run slightly less 32 just feels Much better .

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1 hour ago, A2orry said:

Well written chromejob. Gather you like rice rockets too.dealer recommendations for tyres and pressure as you say can be played with a bit .recommended pressure for my 350 is 35 all round .I run slightly less 32 just feels Much better .

You should not run LESS than the manufacturer's recommended tire pressure for a car. Period. (Generally, their recommended tire pressures are for a balance of traction and ride comfort/noise.) "Feels better" sounds great until you lose traction right into a gully, or have a sidewall blowout from excessive wear and heat buildup. :naughty: 

If you're referring to a motorcycle, I dunno, I'd defer to @WRENCH or @BlueKnight among others. I think I've heard of riders lowering pressure for certain handling characteristics in controlled circumstances. 

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