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Handling Cap Jewels


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#1 OFFLINE   lev

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Posted 14 April 2011 - 06:28 PM

HI
has anyone found a good way of holding a (balance) cap jewel whilst oiling and replacing in the setting i have been experimenting with a small piece of rodico held on i piece of thing brass rod with not to bad results
i was wondering if a thin dia piece of rubber tube (if it can be obtained that thin)on the end of bellows so it is held by suction might work
regards
lev

#2 OFFLINE   seemore

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Posted 15 April 2011 - 03:52 PM

Same as you i use Rodico stuck to the end of a cocktail stick, works for me.

#3 OFFLINE   stevieb

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Posted 16 April 2011 - 12:03 AM

I've made a suction tool from a 50ml syringe for picking up small diamonds prior to setting, it worked but my design was very three handed and not very well developed.

The ones you can buy [eB*y 280628665563]are very good ergonomically but you would have to modify the tip to accept the smaller item.

Easyer said than done. the smallest silicone tube i could find kept flattening when i applied the vaccume.

Check out Cooksons or leRonka they may have something.

steve

#4 OFFLINE   lev

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Posted 17 April 2011 - 05:58 PM

HI
thanks for the replies will try out the syringe
thanks again
les

#5 OFFLINE   Dusty

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Posted 22 April 2011 - 11:16 AM

This is the best way of holding the end stones when oiling but you do need a good pair of tweezers to do this, then its just a matter of placing the setting on top and checking that you have a nice round deposit of oil

Posted Image

should look like this when your done nice circle of oil

Posted Image

#6 OFFLINE   stiff muckler

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Posted 24 April 2011 - 02:20 PM

View PostDusty, on 22 April 2011 - 11:16 AM, said:

This is the best way of holding the end stones when oiling but you do need a good pair of tweezers to do this, then its just a matter of placing the setting on top and checking that you have a nice round deposit of oil

Posted Image

should look like this when your done nice circle of oil

Posted Image

stiff says da this is one of da reasons you have to have da quality tools. You also need to practice da development of proper technique, particularly a "soft" touch with da tweezer. This will be critical to da successful hairspring manipulation.

sm iiH!

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Posted 26 April 2011 - 01:41 PM

View PostDusty, on 22 April 2011 - 11:16 AM, said:

should look like this when your done nice circle of oil

Posted Image
Dusty
I saw this same picture over in photography,and am wondering what degree of magnification you used to take this pic at ?.

It's just that i'm thinking of picking up a scope i've been offered.

#8 OFFLINE   Dusty

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Posted 29 April 2011 - 09:03 AM

View Postlittlealex, on 26 April 2011 - 01:41 PM, said:

View PostDusty, on 22 April 2011 - 11:16 AM, said:

should look like this when your done nice circle of oil

Posted Image
Dusty
I saw this same picture over in photography,and am wondering what degree of magnification you used to take this pic at ?.

It's just that i'm thinking of picking up a scope i've been offered.
Hi
Sorry Cant say what degree of Magnification my microscope was set at but I can tell you is a USB microscope and works v/well It was expensive but I didn't pay for it its what I use at work.

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Posted 29 April 2011 - 01:17 PM

Tah Dusty

I figured [Hoped] it may be around 20X.The second-hand [Mono]scope i've been offered is something like a small and simple [But good quality]20x test scope.
I guess it may take other lenses but only comes with the 20 x.And apart form the smaller eyepieces i'm using,I thought i'd be good for the teenier components just like cap jewels,Staffs etc etc.

The chap only wants the equivalent of a good quality loupe for the thing,so I think i'll probably take it if still available.

...Thanks again

#10 OFFLINE   Dusty

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Posted 01 May 2011 - 07:32 AM

View Postlittlealex, on 29 April 2011 - 01:17 PM, said:

Tah Dusty

I figured [Hoped] it may be around 20X.The second-hand [Mono]scope i've been offered is something like a small and simple [But good quality]20x test scope.
I guess it may take other lenses but only comes with the 20 x.And apart form the smaller eyepieces i'm using,I thought i'd be good for the teenier components just like cap jewels,Staffs etc etc.

The chap only wants the equivalent of a good quality loupe for the thing,so I think i'll probably take it if still available.

...Thanks again
I use a loupe to oil my end stones It would be V/difficult to do under a microscope... that's just used to inspect small components for wear and correct oiling

Edited by Dusty, 01 May 2011 - 07:32 AM.


#11 Guest_littlealex_*

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Posted 02 May 2011 - 04:45 PM

View PostDusty, on 01 May 2011 - 07:32 AM, said:

I use a loupe to oil my end stones It would be V/difficult to do under a microscope... that's just used to inspect small components for wear and correct oiling
... And damage in the form chipped/cracked jewels etc.
Might be useful for re-luming too come to think of it,I remember Bry saying he uses a 20x.

:good:

:D

View PostDusty, on 01 May 2011 - 07:32 AM, said:

I use a loupe to oil my end stones
What magnification would you suggest for this particular job Maestro ?

#12 OFFLINE   Dusty

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Posted 02 May 2011 - 05:48 PM

View Postlittlealex, on 02 May 2011 - 04:45 PM, said:

View PostDusty, on 01 May 2011 - 07:32 AM, said:

I use a loupe to oil my end stones It would be V/difficult to do under a microscope... that's just used to inspect small components for wear and correct oiling
... And damage in the form chipped/cracked jewels etc.
Might be useful for re-luming too come to think of it,I remember Bry saying he uses a 20x.

:good:

:D

View PostDusty, on 01 May 2011 - 07:32 AM, said:

I use a loupe to oil my end stones
What magnification would you suggest for this particular job Maestro ?
for oiling endstones I use Horotec x6.5 you shouldn't need anything much stronger than x10

#13 OFFLINE   Marc H

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Posted 05 May 2011 - 10:02 AM

View PostDusty, on 02 May 2011 - 05:48 PM, said:

View Postlittlealex, on 02 May 2011 - 04:45 PM, said:

View PostDusty, on 01 May 2011 - 07:32 AM, said:

I use a loupe to oil my end stones It would be V/difficult to do under a microscope... that's just used to inspect small components for wear and correct oiling
... And damage in the form chipped/cracked jewels etc.
Might be useful for re-luming too come to think of it,I remember Bry saying he uses a 20x.

:good:

:D

View PostDusty, on 01 May 2011 - 07:32 AM, said:

I use a loupe to oil my end stones
What magnification would you suggest for this particular job Maestro ?
for oiling endstones I use Horotec x6.5 you shouldn't need anything much stronger than x10

I was lucky enough to pick up a Wild M5 stereo microscope for a song at a car boot sale a couple of years ago. In standard trim it gives 6X, 12X, 25X, and 50X magnification but this one also came with a 1.25X module which gives 7.5X, 15X, 31.25X and 62.5X magnification. I have to say that it has revolutionised my watch making.

I get 90mm relief between the objective lens and the subject at the lowest magnification and 95mm at the highest, so plenty of room to work, and the stereo vision makes judging distances and coordinating tools and parts a doddle. Depth of focus is also very good and if need be the 1.25X module also has an adjustable diaphragm to increase depth of focus, albeit at the expense of light. This is hardly ever required though.

Although I don't use this exclusively (I also use a stereo 3X lens pair that clips onto my specs), it does see service for at least 50% of my watch work. 6X or 7.5X mag for most of the time, 15X mag for oiling end stones, and the higher mags for detailed inspection. I get much more working room than I ever did with any loupe, plus the stereo advantage. I also get a much more comfortable working position at my bench. And believe me, you get a whole new perspective on the meaning of "clean" when you start using the higher magnifications.

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Posted 05 May 2011 - 01:30 PM

I've long been considering buying myself a stereoscope,and reading your post has cemented my decision to get one eventually.
The fact that you have reasonable clearance [Unlike a loupe,the higher the magnifaction]to work with is a good enough reason for me to use one of these,But the higher magnification also available makes for more accurate work and provides the ability to work on the more minute ladies watches more comfortably.

Thanks for the advice,And welcome to the forum Marc

:good:





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