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ESL

Skx007 To 009 (bezel) Conversion

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ESL    182

A good few threads ago I wanted to swap my 007 for a 009 because I preferred the "pepsi" bezel. Some helpful forum'er suggested just getting a new bezel, another suggested getting just the bezel insert. I also receved helpful information about where I might get one after - of course - asking our host Roy, first.

So, the bezel duly arrived and after a quick scout around the 'net, I found it should not be that difficult. So here we go.

Now - I know that this task might be considered fairly easy and straightforward for anyone used to "fiddling" with watches. But I'm not! So it was with a little trepidation that I set out to do this. But fear not, for all is photographed for the novice bezel changer to follow.

There are going to be about 6 posts due to limitations with the number of images in each post, so please bear with me till they are all up. I hope you enjoy.

1 of 1

This is all I needed to get started: My Seiko SKX007 - natch, the replacement bezel, my trusty swissy, and a selection of jewellers drivers. I got my bezel off a "trusted" ebay outlet reccomended to me by a forumer, after determining that Roy did not have any at the time. But please do check with him first, its always good form to check, especially if you are going to ask around on the forum where to get one! The only other tool I used, was a small modelmaking vice.

Basically, what you have to do, is get the old bezel off, take out the old bezel insert, replace the bezel, finally fitting the new bezel insert. Easy eh?

Getting the old bezel off according to most internet articles I have read, seems to mean looking around the watch case where the bezel meets the case, to find the "removal" slot. Well, perhaps they are present on the older models, but there were not any on the 007 I had in my hands Anyway - not to worry - the principle is just the same.

Find somewhere on the watch case where you can insert a good quality, thin, blade to act as a lever. I chose between the watch lugs, so if the tool slipped, any resultant damage may well be concealed by the bracelet/strap.

Your average swissy has an ideal blade for this, but whaterver you use, make sure its very strong and thin enough to get between the bezel and case. Once in, GENTLY twist and lever. Eventually, the bezel should start to lift off the case.

<b>Be careful now</b>, as you want to see exacty how everything fits together a it comes apart. On my 007, everything was quite straight forward.

What I was left with, was the watch case, bezel, and ratcheting device.

More in the next post.

LINK TO ARTICLE ...... bezel conversion

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ESL    182

2 of 6

The importance of stressing that the bezel should be removed slowly to see how it all fits is most important. In other internet articles I have seen, the mechanism is different. All I can do is show you how mine works.

user posted image

The ratcheting device is fairly a straightforward affair, comprising a pressed steel circle, with two locating pins spaced 108 degress apart, and two spring sections, also located 180 degrees apart. The pins locate into holes in the watch case, and the springs locate into detents, cast into the underside of the bezel - easy really.

For reference only, here is a photo of the watch case with the bezel removed.

user posted image

As can be seen, the 007 case is a solid chunk of stainless steel. It's also pleasing to see the thickness and stylish bevel on the watch crystal whlst the bezel is off. Also visible is a rubber sealing ring. Be very careful to ensure that this stays seated in its groove, when replacing the bezel.

And finally, the underside of the bezel ring:

user posted image

Here you can see the detents where the ratcheting device springs locate, to provide unidirectional rotation.

on to the next post...

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ESL    182

Now - the tricky bit. Tricky that is, if you wish to keep your old 007 bezel insert!

You can see on the photo below, that the inner edge of the bezel insert is slightly larger than the metel bezel on which it is seated. This presents you with a small "flange" with which to work.

user posted image

Again, using a fine edged blade, work the tip of the blade between the bezel insert and the bezel. Be very careful here as the bezel inserts are only aluminium and are very easy to bend and mark. My bezel was secured by a fairly strong adhesive, but other internet articles I have read indicate that some bezel inserts may only be held by friction. (i.e. the hole in the bezel ring and the bezel insert are so closely sized. that the bezel is a push to fit.)

user posted image

Once you have worked the tip of the blade between the bezel rign and the insert, you can start to work your way around the bezel, gradually woring it loose. I found it quite easy to rotate the bezel ring along the tabletop, and keeping even pressure on the knife at it rotated (the photo above shows what I mean wink.gif

user posted image

Finally, the bezel insert is ready to part company with the bezel. As you can see, the adhesive looks like it was some sort of double-sided tape. Be careful when removing the old bezel, as when I removed mine, the luminous dot was left behind on the bezel ring.

Onto the next post.

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ESL    182

Time for reassembly.

First thing to do, is to clean up the adhesive on the bezel. I cleaned all the old adhesive off, because I was going to use a small quantity of new to retain the replacement bezel insert.

Now is time to remember how it all came apart: You do remember don't you blink.gif

user posted image

On my 007, it is a simple task to replace the ratcheting device. The pins on the ring simply locate into the corresponding holes on the watch case. once in place, now we come to the extra careful bit. Replacing the bezel.

What is needed is a method of applying quite firm, but very evenly applied pressure to the bezel, in order to get it to snap back onto the case, with the ratcheting device correctly located. I use a small modellers vice, simply because it is easy to apply controlled pressure, evenly across the bezel face. I'll leave you to decide how you will do it, but the photo below shows you what it required.

user posted image

gently apply pressure evenly on the bezel till it snaps home. Sounds easy doesn't it eek.gif . I can imagine that it would be quite difficult to do witout some form of vice or case back press. Its very important to apply pressure evely, and be very careful not to apply pressure to the crystal..

Once it snaps home, check that it rotates and ratchets as smoothly as it did before. If it does not, it will have to come off again and be refitted. Either the rubber sealing ring may have slipped out of its groove, or the ratcheting device may have become unseated.

user posted image

Once its on and working well, turn the bezel against its normal rotation. This is to make sure you are not mid-way between clicks. It is an important step becasue we are know going to fit the new bezel insert, and we need to ensure correct alignment with the 12 o'clock position.

On to the next post.

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ESL    182

The next bit is pretty straightforward. So straightforward it did not really merit too much photography.

Once you have made sure that the bezel is fully up against its ratchet, you need to fit the replacement bezel ring. On mine it was a nice tight push fit. I used just a small amout of an impact adhesive, just to be sure.

Offer the bezel ring up to the bezel making sure the diamond on the bezel is pointing exactly at the 12 marker on the dial, and start press fitting the bezel ring into place. Start at the 12 marker and with both thumbs, gradually work your way around to the 6 o'clock position, until the ring is fitted.

user posted image

As I said, mine fitted a dream, but some internet articles I have read indicate that dependant on the tolerances, you may have to push a bit, or even carry out a small amount of filing, to get the ring into place.

Once in place, just check that the diamond aligns correctly with the click-stop positions, or it will all have to come off again, to realign it. taz.gif

Finally, here is the watch, reassembled and with its old bezel about to be stored for possible reuse.

user posted image

All in all a nice easy project and one that most of us should be able to do - should we wish to. In actual fact, there are other types of replacement bezel out there, from original Seiko variants, to mil type and others too. So why not have a look around to see if anything takes your fancy. Just do a quick Google for seiko bezel change or seiko bezel insert. You know how to google, just have a good look around.

On to the final part.

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ESL    182

So - was it worth it?

Before:

user posted image

After:

user posted image

I think so! biggrin.gif

I know its not exactly a 009 model, as the 009's have a dark blue dial, but I quite like the black face with the "pepsi" bezel. I think it works.

Hope you enjoyed looking at the photos, and that this may be of some use to anyone contemplating a bezel insert swap.

Cheers

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Roy    5,534

Well done George, that should prove to be a very useful tutorial. wink.gif

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ESL    182

Cheers Roy, coming from a professional, that means a lot to me. smile.gif I must admit I had to think twice when I photographed it in the vice eek.gif I thought - what am I doing???

laugh.gif

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Stan    5,149

It sure looks woth it to me George, very smart indeed. biggrin.gif

Good tutorial too. wink.gif

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MIKE    1

Very intresting George, well done punk.gif

Can you do dial replacement next..................please ph34r.gifohmy.gif

MiKE

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JoT    120

Nice tutorial George and good result yes.gif

Roy is there any way that the 6 posts can be combined or linked in some way?

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ESL    182

Very intresting George, well done punk.gif

Can you do dial replacement next..................please ph34r.gif  ohmy.gif

MiKE

eek.gifeek.gifeek.gif

Taking the back off Mike and getting the innards, outwards - is a whole new ball game!! laugh.gif

There are other people, far better qualified than I to do a series like that. But - I would love to see it myself too, so if anyone feels like it, Mike and I would both like to see how it all works.

smile.gif

Edited by ESL

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Barryboy    23

What an excellent post. My own Seiko 6309-7049 of about 1977 needs a new bezel insert as the red is faded.

This almost makes me confident enough to have a go.

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ESL    182

OK, here goes:-

This is what I used:

gallery_240_5_110878.jpg

This is the new "Pepsi" bezel, available from a few places on the net and on ebay.

med_gallery_240_5_56527.jpg

Now you need to look for the very thin gap between the bezel and watch case. Older Seiko divers had a small gap between the lugs where you could insert a thin blade, as far as I know, newer styles do not. So be careful and use a strong blade. I found that the small knife blade of a Swiss Army Knife did the job just fine.

med_gallery_240_5_38337.jpg

Prise VERY carefully, all around the case, and it will eventually come off, leaving you with a bezel ring, the click ring, and the watch body. The click ring on the newer models is all in one piece - older divers have a ball and spring arrangement, but this is simpler.

med_gallery_240_5_23265.jpg

more to come...

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ESL    182

Be careful with the click ring as you must not distort it in any way. This picture shows the part of the spring that controls the uni-directional rotation of the bezel.

med_gallery_240_5_91202.jpg

Once the bezel is off, take the opportunity to clean the area where the bezel sits - particularly the lower ring nearer the case body as this is where the rubber friction ring in the bezel sits. If your bezel is stiff - this and the rubber ring will need cleaning:

med_gallery_240_5_44420.jpg

This is the bezel and the rubber bezel friction-ring. Be careful when cleaning this not to distort it in any way, or it will be a pig to refit it and the bezel.

med_gallery_240_5_11451.jpg

This shows the detents for the click ring. Its a good idea to give this a clean as well, while the whole thing is accessible.

med_gallery_240_5_26459.jpg

more to come...

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ESL    182

Now this is where you have to be careful - to get the old bezel off, you need to get a thin blade between it and the bezel. The bezel is steel and the bezel insert is only aluminium - so be careful if you don't want to bend the bezel insert so you can use it again.

ALSO - on Seiko original bezel rings, the lume pip at 12 o clock is separate from the bezel ring and could fall out (and it's very small) so watch out for it.

med_gallery_240_5_50961.jpg

Once you have the blade between the ring and the insert, work it around the whole ring, rotating the ring as you go, very carefully to break the seal between the double sided adhesive keeping the bezel ring attached.

med_gallery_240_5_5743.jpg

Here you can see ring all but off. You can also see the lume pip on the left hand side of the bezel ring - just about to fall off.

So - with the bits off, it's time to get everything cleaned off ready for re-assembly. take particular care over the bits of double sided adhesive on the bezel.

med_gallery_240_5_65580.jpg

More to follow...

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ESL    182

The most important part to get right during re-assembly, is the click-ring. Look on the click ring and you will see a peg. Now look on the watch body, near the 2 o clock position, and you will see a drilled whole where the peg locates. This is your first job - fit the click-ring onto the watch body so that the peg fits into the hole.

med_gallery_240_5_39910.jpg

Make sure that you have not bent the click-ring when you took it off. It should lie flat on the watch, with only the one-way ratchet spring pointing upwards.

Now the difficult bit - refitting the bezel. It is very important that the bezel goes on correctly or it will jam and be impossible to turn. MAKE SURE that the rubber friction ring is perfectly fitted into the bezel ring and is not loose. Very carefully offer the bezel ring up to the watch and gently place it into position, so that it is perfectly square and parallel - meaning all sides of the ring are level with the watch body and one side will not go down first.

To finally fit the ring needs a lot of controlled force and if not done in a measured manner can force out the rubber friction ring, jamming the bezel and you could shatter the watch crystal if you get it wrong. Now I am sure there are many "proper" tools to do this, but many of us won't have access to them. But you might have access to a vice.

med_gallery_240_5_29032.jpg

This is perhaps the easiest way to get a lot of controlled force onto the bezel and ensure it forces the bezel ring on "square" and also wont press on the crystal in the process - even if something slips.

Be careful to protect the watch from the metal faces of the vice, I used thick card.

The trick is simply to slowly close the vice until you see that it is fitted back onto the watch correctly. Close the vice just enough. Once refitted - take the watch out and ensure the bezel rotates freely and that the unidirectional clicker is working. If it is not, or the bezel is very stiff, then the bezel will need to be taken completely off to be checked for damage and then refitted.

If all is well - You should be left ready to fit the new bezel ring.

gallery_240_5_70872.jpg

more to follow...

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ESL    182

The trick in getting the replacement bezel to line up correctly is all in the next part.

It is important to make sure that before you fit the new bezel ring, that you try to rotate the bezel against the ratchet until there is no reverse movement against the clicker.

med_gallery_240_5_46988.jpg

You then need to unpack the replacement ring and if it has not been fitted with double-sided adhesive already, then get some and fit it onto the bezel. Not too thick or the bezel will not sit into the bezel correctly.

Now, very accurately place the replacement ring into the bezel ensuring that the arrow is exactly aligned with the 12 o clock position, before gently pressing it home. Some bezel rings may be a tight fit and may even require a small amount of filing to fit correctly. This is normally only ever to the outer diameter of the bezel ring. However, mostly it will be a nice tight fit.

med_gallery_240_5_18147.jpg

Now, just as a matter of interest - a lot of people belive that other than the bezel, there is no other difference between a 007 and a 009. Well - they are incorrect. A 007 dial is actually matt black - a 009 dial is a very dark blue. Now you can see that this watch is clearly a 007 watch, but with a 009 style bezel insert.

Mind you - I have seen some 009's with a black and red bezl insert (rather than dark blue and red) and these seem to have a black dial, not a blue one, so who knows. Anyway, as far as I know, all Japan made 009's (J series, not K) seem to have had a dark blue dial orignally, rather than a black dial.

So there it is - with the old 007 ring ready to be kept in cae you want to refit it. Remember to keep a look out for the bezel-ring lume pip. As you can see, it has already fell out of this one!!!

med_gallery_240_5_88570.jpg

Hope you found this useful.

;)

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The trick in getting the replacement bezel to line up correctly is all in the next part.

It is important to make sure that before you fit the new bezel ring, that you try to rotate the bezel against the ratchet until there is no reverse movement against the clicker.

med_gallery_240_5_46988.jpg

You then need to unpack the replacement ring and if it has not been fitted with double-sided adhesive already, then get some and fit it onto the bezel. Not too thick or the bezel will not sit into the bezel correctly.

Now, very accurately place the replacement ring into the bezel ensuring that the arrow is exactly aligned with the 12 o clock position, before gently pressing it home. Some bezel rings may be a tight fit and may even require a small amount of filing to fit correctly. This is normally only ever to the outer diameter of the bezel ring. However, mostly it will be a nice tight fit.

med_gallery_240_5_18147.jpg

Now, just as a matter of interest - a lot of people belive that other than the bezel, there is no other difference between a 007 and a 009. Well - they are incorrect. A 007 dial is actually matt black - a 009 dial is a very dark blue. Now you can see that this watch is clearly a 007 watch, but with a 009 style bezel insert.

Mind you - I have seen some 009's with a black and red bezl insert (rather than dark blue and red) and these seem to have a black dial, not a blue one, so who knows. Anyway, as far as I know, all Japan made 009's (J series, not K) seem to have had a dark blue dial orignally, rather than a black dial.

So there it is - with the old 007 ring ready to be kept in cae you want to refit it. Remember to keep a look out for the bezel-ring lume pip. As you can see, it has already fell out of this one!!!

med_gallery_240_5_88570.jpg

Hope you found this useful.

;)

Excellent. Many thanks for this. It's a job I've been meaning to do for a while now. Definitely one for when the Winter evenings draw in and it's too cold to get out in the garden any more.

So that's next Wednesday evening taken care of !

Many thanks.

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