• Sign Up to reply and join the friendliest Watch Forum on the web. Stick around, get to 50 posts and gain access to your full profile and additional features such as a personal messaging system, chat room and the sales forum PLUS the chance to enter our regular giveaways.
pg tips

Acrylic Polish Pictorial

99 posts in this topic

resurrecting an old thread as I just took delivery of my first tube of Polywatch! Anybody know if the stuff also works on scratched CDs/DVDs and plastic lensed glasses (e.g. sunglasses)?

The advice when using Brasso says to work back and forward in straight lines - is this also the recommended method for watch crystals?

Any and all advice appreciated

Dave

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I always use a circular rubbing motion ( steady on at the back there )

It does work on CD / DVDs but I would be careful on sunnies as they often have coatings that would be rubbed off...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

nice post+tutorial, ya coulda taken the crystal out ya idle bugger, save getting crud everywhere :P

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use drawing pins to put part sheets of different grades of wet and dry (Over a cloth to act as a cushion) on a piece of good flat plywood for the scratches. Or if I'm not feeling tight, I just put in a new crystal!!!

Mike

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is a fantasic thread, thanks so much. I had to remove some scratches on my Oris pointer date.

Didn't have any Brasso to hand but had some Autosol and that worked spot on.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm thinking this would work on mobile phone screens as well ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great post, just completed my first acrylic refinish and am astounded with the results.

Thanks for taking the time to write up the tutorial.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

OK - typical noob dumb question...

How do I know my grandfather's watch has acrylic and not glass crystal?? All advice appreciated.

It's a Seiko 5 Sportsmatic 6619-9990 - serial number is 6101572 (I'm guesing Jan '66) in fact here it is...

Seiko5Sportsmatic_6619-9990_iphone1

My link

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

OK - typical noob dumb question...

How do I know my grandfather's watch has acrylic and not glass crystal?? All advice appreciated.

It's a Seiko 5 Sportsmatic 6619-9990 - serial number is 6101572 (I'm guesing Jan '66) in fact here it is...

Seiko5Sportsmatic_6619-9990_iphone1

My link

Yours is an acrylic.

The "technical" way to tell i to tap them with your fingernail. If it sounds like tic tic tic, it's acrylic. If it sounds like tac tac tac, it's glass.

I also happen to know that tension/armoured ring crystals on vintage Seikos were acrylic.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

tap it on your top front teeth, honest you can feel the difference between glass and plastic, acrylic feels warmer and softer too

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

tap it on your top front teeth, honest you can feel the difference between glass and plastic, acrylic feels warmer and softer too

I agree with Paul.....touch it to your top lip....if it feels cold it's glass,......if it feels warm, it's plastic/acrylic..........

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

tap it on your top front teeth, honest you can feel the difference between glass and plastic, acrylic feels warmer and softer too

I agree with Paul.....touch it to your top lip....if it feels cold it's glass,......if it feels warm, it's plastic/acrylic..........

Thanks Roger - here I am seeking guidance and knowledge from all over the world on the great wide interweb and I get words of wisdom from just a mile up the road!

I see what you mean about the temperature - my Christopher Ward and Breitling feel considerably colder to the touch. They're much less convex too - though that might just be styling.

Cheers!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm with PG Tips on this one. Tap it on your top front teeth. You can't mistake it. Its just so obvious once you've tried it.

tap it on your top front teeth, honest you can feel the difference between glass and plastic, acrylic feels warmer and softer too

I agree with Paul.....touch it to your top lip....if it feels cold it's glass,......if it feels warm, it's plastic/acrylic..........

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

<img src='http://www.wrist-watch.info/pgtips/timexnondate8.jpg' border='0' alt='user posted image' />

wow, looks good. i can't get brasso here in spain but i have found some similar metal polish which i added some toothpaste to and polished out light scratches on an oris i bough off ebay. quite successful.

i was a bit wary of using wet and dry but after seeing your results i might try it if i get anything with deeper scratches.

i also think rubbing the watch on the cloth not the other way aroung is the way to go, much easier i think than trying to hold on to the watch and rubbing the same direction with a cloth.

thanks for all the helpful hints.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Extra tip - when tapping on your teeth don't catch the edge of a rado on the tip of a front tooth!!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

<u>Now to polish.</u>

I use good old household Brasso and a Vileda cloth folded twice on itself (so it’s 4 layers thick).

<img src="http://www.wrist-watch.info/pgtips/timexnondate4.jpg" border="0" class="linked-image" />

Place the cloth on a hard level surface and pour a small amount of Brasso in the middle.

<img src="http://www.wrist-watch.info/pgtips/timexnondate5.jpg" border="0" class="linked-image" />

Now place the watch face down in the Brasso and vigorously rub back and forth (again no circles).

<img src="http://www.wrist-watch.info/pgtips/timexnondate7.jpg" border="0" class="linked-image" />

There is no need to press the watch hard down into the cloth, in fact you could crack the crystal doing this so just keep a light pressure and nice and fast back and forth. The fast rubbing actually melts the surface of the acrylic which is what gives it such an even polish when finished.

Pay particular attention to the edges, you may have to move the watch to an angle of 45 degrees to do this. Keep going all over, as long as you go back and forth you can go in all directions, i.e. 12 to 6, 9 to 3 etc until it’s had a good polish up. Then get a dry cloth and rub away the left over Brasso and you should have a nicely polished good as new crystal.

<u>The finished crystal</u>

this picture isn't the best as I've taken it under artificial light but it shows how good the polishing is. YES IT IS THE SAME WATCH!

<img src="http://www.wrist-watch.info/pgtips/timexnondate.jpg" border="0" class="linked-image" />

Hope this has been of help.

Just thought id through this one into the pot!

I always use T Cut after sanding, also works wonders on stainless steel.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posting to bump up a great thread.

I just tried it with a beater Timex, when I say beater, I mean brutalized - you could barely read the dial.

500 grit, followed by 800 grit, then 1200 grit and Wrights Brass Polish (couldn't find Brasso around here)

You'd think it was a brand new crystal.

Followed it up with my 15 year olds watch, you can imagine the condition that was in. Another perfect crystal.

Now onto some of my better watches, although I'll probably do those with the crystal removed to avoid any mistakes/rubs on the cases.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Must admit this was my first job at tinkering (from this post) and it worked brilliantly good confidence builder.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Iv'e used Brasso on mine in the past and it works as good as anything else out there.Just did the G10 I got yesterday.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

that's great really helpful i was going to use polywatch i will give your method ago and see how i get on.many thanks and nice to see some step by step guides very useful :thumbsup:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That is a FANTASTIC result. I'd never have thought you could do that.

Thanks for posting it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a CASIO Waveceptor with some scratches in the crystal. I assume the crystal is plastic. I'm assuming that mineral or sapphire crystals would only come with a much more expesive timepiece.

If it's plastic, I'm thinking of trying Polywatch or fine grit sandpaper. I see where Polywatch is available on Amazon. Any opinions on the best buys (manufacturers, types, etc.) for sandpaper?

Thanks,

Jeff

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am just about to attempt to clean up a Rotary crystal, what I would like to know is how much pressure do you use on the wet & dry, light or heavy. or does it not matter.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

just do it light and let the wet and dry do the work, dont go ape -remember you are polishing a type of plastic, too much pressure and you will break it , for deep scratches that need sanding i remove the crystal and use the reverse method (lay the wet and dry down and rub the crystal on it , same for polishing -i use a piece of felt with autosol (or whatever cutting compound you are using) and rub the crystal on it rather than the other way round , i find it easier.

Edited by pugster

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.