Jump to content
  • Sign Up to reply and join the friendliest Watch Forum on the web. Stick around, get to 50 posts and gain access to your full profile and additional features such as a personal messaging system, chat room and the sales forum PLUS the chance to enter our regular giveaways.
pg tips

Acrylic Polish Pictorial

Recommended Posts

hotmog    27

This is the kind of thing I wish I'd known about 30-odd years ago! My father scratched the acrylic on his brand new Explorer 1 (£310 from Leslie Davies) within a couple of days of getting it, when putting the bins out one night. He was absolutely mortified, and lost confidence in it to such an extent that he agreed soon after to swap it for my Tudor Ranger II + £50. I soon came to accept as a fact of life that, due to the nature of its material and its prominent position on the watch, the crystal inevitably attracted scratches. Knowing no better, I would resign myself to having to wait 3-4 years for its next service before I would again be able view the watch restored to its pristine glory.

:cry2:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
pg tips    6

I have a colleague who flies light aircraft in a club, he caught me polishing a timex the other day and asked what I was doing so I explained. Ah that would explain the brasso type smell in the plane after it's been serviced he said, they use a similar method to get the scratches out of the acrylic windows!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
deano42    0

PG

I hear the call of Blue Peter calling you...first the IKEA photo box and now the Brasso crystal polishing.!

Thanks for the tutorial

deano

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
devs    0

Good work mate - I'll hold off on that one though untill I've got a few more watches together ;)

Good Luck.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Nalu    3

devs second "after" photo reminds me of a method I use to find residual subtle scratches: look at the watch in sunlight from an angle. Even small scratches will cast a shadow on the dial (esp white or silver) that can help you spot them.

Great post, PG!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
grey    2

Now to polish.

I use good old household Brasso and a Vileda cloth folded twice on itself (so it’s 4 layers thick).

IPB Image

Place the cloth on a hard level surface and pour a small amount of Brasso in the middle.

IPB Image

Now place the watch face down in the Brasso and vigorously rub back and forth (again no circles).

IPB Image

There is no need to press the watch hard down into the cloth, in fact you could crack the crystal doing this so just keep a light pressure and nice and fast back and forth. The fast rubbing actually melts the surface of the acrylic which is what gives it such an even polish when finished.

Pay particular attention to the edges, you may have to move the watch to an angle of 45 degrees to do this. Keep going all over, as long as you go back and forth you can go in all directions, i.e. 12 to 6, 9 to 3 etc until it’s had a good polish up. Then get a dry cloth and rub away the left over Brasso and you should have a nicely polished good as new crystal.

The finished crystal

this picture isn't the best as I've taken it under artificial light but it shows how good the polishing is.

IPB Image

Hope this has been of help.

Thanks Paul,

After the initial terror of the 400 paper, it becomes truly therapeutic. Tried it on a Seiko 7625 I gave to SWMBO in 1968 and which has never been treated before. Incredible result (unfortunately not good at photos).

Graham

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Nalu    3

Another Polywatch 'Before and After' success story! This is a vintage Ploprof bezel which had seen better days yet still had good lume:

IPB Image

IPB Image

And after: wabi is still present, but the microscratches are gone, the bezel is an inky black, and much more clear

IPB Image

IPB Image

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Wien    0

Nice post! Can we use Brasso for polishing cases, too? I mean stainless steel or other base metal ones.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
nursegladys    0

Well that's up to the boss, the problem with pinning stuff is eventually you end up having to scroll down pages to get to the live threads. Annoys the tits off me on other forum when I see a whole page of pinned threads.

Maybe a hints and tips Forum? :D

Hints and tits Forum ? :ph34r:

Bints and tits?

:rofl::rofl::rofl:

Nice tips Paul

You could call the help thread "get yer tips out", just a thought :blink:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Timetraveller   
Guest Timetraveller

Just an add on if you get just the one scratch you don't have to go over the whole crystal with the Wet and Dry, Just sand at rightangles to the scratch, if it's not too deep you can get away with just the 1200.

Then use the brasso. I've not tried Mer Stan but like every member of the male population over a certain age I have some in the garage somewhere so I'll give it a try.

Polywatch is very good if you just want to give it a quick buff up if it's dulled down a bit. It will not remove deep scratches on it's own though. Roy is the cheapest supplier of polywatch in the world, I think!

well impressed mate :ok:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
pg tips    6

looks like a different watch ?

If you mean my Timex then no, I can assure you it is the same watch.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
JOHNB    0

Fantastic post, Im seriously thinking of buying a junker just to try it

John

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know this is a really old thread but I just wanted to say I tried this yesterday and was AMAZED at the results. :D

I have now polished six acrylic's that had minor scratches but I didn't sand any of them down, just did the Brasso on cloth trick and that did the job. One was worse that the others and I can see a slight 'scar' remaining, but I feel confident enough to tackle that one when I have a bit more time on my hands.

I couldn't repair the Dremel gouge I made while polishing the case on one of them :nono: naughty Dremel!!!! I feel 35,000 rpm might be a bit fast to touch against the acrylic, but that’s a whole different thread!

Thanks for the info and if you are a newbie or lurker give it a go!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
jasonm    471

Well done for having a go......The results can be very satisfying !

And another Cambridge lad eh!

There are loads of 'us' in the area now :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
watchnutz    1

Just to add a slight modification to Paul's EXCELLENT tip on polishing. I use these sanding sticks that are available in hobby shops for use on plastic models. The reason I prefer them is that I find I have more control because of the stiffness of the sticks. This is really useful if you are doing the work with the crystal still in the watch and lessens the chance of scratching the case.. They are still flexable enough that you can bend them to the contour of the crystal. There is also a coarse grit available.

114104864.jpg

As for final polishing, I use a product called Crystal Clear professional polish. It is a sort of creme consistancy with VERY fine grit that will smooth out any last little marks. BTW for very last cleaning of crystals, both inside and out after ANY work, I find "Sight Savers" premoistened sheets to be excellent in removing any fingerprints, residue, or dust.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×