Acrylic Polish Pictorial

99 posts in this topic

Posted

I was polishing up an acrylic and I thought I’d do a picture story to show how I do it. Most of you regulars will probably have similar methods but I thought it might be useful for newbies and lurkers.

The watch to be fettled is the boys Timex non date that Neil sourced for me.

In the Beginning

user posted image

I start by looking in which direction the majority of scratches run, you want to start by going across the scratches as much as possible. DO NOT GO IN CIRCLES. Looking at this watch the best direction that goes across most of the scratches looks to be from 8 to 2.

So very carefully, taking care not to scratch the bezel or case, take a small piece of 400 grade wet and dry paper, use it dry and gently rub back and forth in the chosen direction. Every 10 seconds or so stop, rub off the dust with your thumb and check to see if you need to go deeper, you want a nice even sanding across the whole crystal so no scratches are visible. Sometimes you will see deeper nicks as they stand out white (like at 1 below).

user posted image

If this is the case then go a little further on that spot until it has gone. On domed crystals you may have to run the wet and dry around the edge to remove scratches.

Once you have a nice even finish you need to move up to 1200 grade wet and dry. Sand at 90 degrees to the direction you used the 400 so in this case from 11 to 5. This shouldn’t take long, again use your thumb to remove the dust and check for a nice even sanding.

user posted image

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Posted

Now to polish.

I use good old household Brasso and a Vileda cloth folded twice on itself (so it’s 4 layers thick).

timexnondate4.jpg

Place the cloth on a hard level surface and pour a small amount of Brasso in the middle.

timexnondate5.jpg

Now place the watch face down in the Brasso and vigorously rub back and forth (again no circles).

timexnondate7.jpg

There is no need to press the watch hard down into the cloth, in fact you could crack the crystal doing this so just keep a light pressure and nice and fast back and forth. The fast rubbing actually melts the surface of the acrylic which is what gives it such an even polish when finished.

Pay particular attention to the edges, you may have to move the watch to an angle of 45 degrees to do this. Keep going all over, as long as you go back and forth you can go in all directions, i.e. 12 to 6, 9 to 3 etc until it’s had a good polish up. Then get a dry cloth and rub away the left over Brasso and you should have a nicely polished good as new crystal.

The finished crystal

this picture isn't the best as I've taken it under artificial light but it shows how good the polishing is. YES IT IS THE SAME WATCH!

timexnondate.jpg

Hope this has been of help.

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Posted

user posted image

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Posted

Wow...Great job Paul!! biggrin.gif

We should put all these 'Tips tips' in one place... smile.gif

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Posted

Nice post PG.

Always scares me a bit to see the 400 grit "after" shot. eek.gif

smile.gif

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Posted

Nice post PG.

Always scares me a bit to see the 400 grit "after" shot.  eek.gif

smile.gif

I remember the 1st time I did it george after reading about this method. Though Oh my god what have I done, but once you've done a couple you get a feel for it and can knock em out in a few minutes.

Mineral grystals are possible (as Bry has shown) but take a hell of a lot more sanding and elbow grease!

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Posted

That's one hell of a good job PG. ohmy.gif

I discovered Mer is good for a final buff up today after polishing me G10 crystals.

It's safe on plastic, at least that's what it said on the bottle. laugh.giflaugh.gif

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Posted

Wow! blink.gif

Great post PG. Thanks!

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Posted

Top man PG!

Fantastic job on the Timex.

That will be an invaluable resource for newbies and even many old hands. smile.gif

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Posted

Well done Paul, biggrin.gif

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Posted

Excellent Job Paul biggrin.gif

Have you polished any mineral lenses, the first one for me was Torture sad.gif

Regards

Bry

Well done Paul,  biggrin.gif

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Posted

I've done a couple of minerals Bry (didn't I show you that Richo qtz?) but as you say torture. Have to be flat (don't even attempt a domed one) and lots and lots of back and forth. Might be easier on a belt sander but I'm not that brave and I never did get a perfect finish.

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Posted

Top Tip PG

Great result

Cheers Mal

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Posted

Paul,

I didn't know you refurbed the Ricoh. Did you use Ce02 to polish the mineral? Domed crystals aint to bad actually, just gotta use machine power:D

How is the Ricoh for accuracy, bet it keeps good time?

Regards

Bry

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Posted

Just an add on if you get just the one scratch you don't have to go over the whole crystal with the Wet and Dry, Just sand at rightangles to the scratch, if it's not too deep you can get away with just the 1200.

Then use the brasso. I've not tried Mer Stan but like every member of the male population over a certain age I have some in the garage somewhere so I'll give it a try.

Polywatch is very good if you just want to give it a quick buff up if it's dulled down a bit. It will not remove deep scratches on it's own though. Roy is the cheapest supplier of polywatch in the world, I think!

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Posted

That will be an invaluable resource for newbies and even many old hands

How about it Paul? Worthy of being 'pinned' I reckon smile.gif

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Posted

Well that's up to the boss, the problem with pinning stuff is eventually you end up having to scroll down pages to get to the live threads. Annoys the tits off me on other forum when I see a whole page of pinned threads.

Maybe a hints and tips Forum? biggrin.gif

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Posted

Hints and tits Forum ? ph34r.gif

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Posted

Bints and tits?

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Posted

Hi all just thought I'd post a couple of before and after shots of my recent purchase that I'm trying to bring back to life... As you can see its quite an improvement thanks to PGs great tips ;)

IPB Image

IPB Image

Cheers,

Devs ;)

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Posted

WOW! Way to go Devs! That's made me really chuffed knowing that the time I spent in putting together the tips has helped you bring that f300 to life!

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Posted

nice job devs ,easier than trying to polish a mineral glass aint it :D

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Posted

Yeah cheers PG I found it really helpful and am very happy with the results! Its almost back to life now just a question regarding its battery but I'll post that on another thread.

pugster :D

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Posted

Great description.. though I doubt that the friction of moving the watch back and forth will "melt" the acrylic.. you need about 270degF to start melting it..... and about 115-240°F to soften it..

I think..

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Posted

just what I read elsewhere Freb, mind you the speed I rub I'm suprised I haven't put a hole in one yet :ph34r:

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