Jump to content
  • Sign Up to reply and join the friendliest Watch Forum on the web. Stick around, get to 50 posts and gain access to your full profile and additional features such as a personal messaging system, chat room and the sales forum PLUS the chance to enter our regular giveaways.
pauluspaolo

Bug Photos

Recommended Posts

Great pics Roger..

Thanks for the heads up i love my Reptiles :thumbup:

What does Mrs dodger do while your taking pics , your on holiday remember :grin:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice bugs Roger! Looks like it would have been bug heaven for me, really cool to see the pads of the Gecko up close. It must be difficult to be able to handle them like that.

Tony

Luckily, my son caught the gecko from under a rock he turned over, and it was very docile and easy to catch. I have been handling reptiles and insects for pics for over 40 years and you just need to be very gentle. Some larger lizards and geckos may give you a nip, but nothing serious. Mind you...you won't see me holding a scorpion or a hornet anytime soon. I feel it is a privilege to be able to cherish something that most people will never see, let alone hold, and it also serves to give a sense of scale to the pic. ie. you can see how big/small a creature is compared to my hand. Also, there is no better, or gentler way to be able to offer the subject up to the lens. At the end of all pic sessions, all creatures are gently released back where they came from. Except the mole...he went into a neighbouring field! :lookaround:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great pics Roger..

What does Mrs dodger do while your taking pics , your on holiday remember :grin:

She's normally to be found on a sunbed, covered in factor 30 and with a large glass of white wine by her side! :beach:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

they're all released unharmed after a shoot! :thumbsup:

That's why I haven't posted anything yet... just the other day I was trying to photograph a moth but the damn thing would fly away just to settle down again half a meter away. I was really starting to get pi*# off and thinking that if I wacked it with a rolled magazine it would stay put for a picture. But then I would be upsetting you and Mach... and maybe the picture wouldn't be of a full moth after that :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

...only for a few minutes to calm them down...they're all released unharmed after a shoot! :thumbsup:

I wonder if that works for kids?

Tony

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Now that Spring is on the way, it heralds a new year of bug pics! Found today when the lady of the house asked me to get the patio furniture out...opened the parasol to give it an airing and found this hibernating colony of ladybirds isde one of the folds. Goodness knows why they all congregated in that particular fold! It looks as though there are several different species here, including some that look similar to the rogue Harlequin strain that's been inundating the countryside, but as I'm not 100% sure, I'll let them be.....

002.jpg

001-1.jpg

003.jpg

004-2.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Having been out in cypress late last year i came accross a couple of insects , the moth i saved from the pool and was happy to sit while he was drying out....

sw0371.jpg

He then moved on to some grass...

sw038.jpg

Then later , when i was tryin to take a pic of a flower , i held a stem to stop the wind moving the flower head around, i must of disturbed the 4 inch praying mantis that was sheltering there. Believe me, i got the bigger fright !!!!

sw039.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We were at Bempton Cliffs this weekend & there were loads of these wooly bears sunbathing on the fence at the edge of the cloths - anyone know what butterfly/moth they transform into?

:)

IMG_0346-1.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Does anyone remember this chap from last year? It's a caterpillar of the Eyed Hawk moth, and if you do remember, I kept a couple in order to watch them metamorphosise to adulthood.

Caterpillars011.jpg

eventually, they changed to pupae, and I put them away to overwinter in some damp peat.

Bugpics024-1.jpg

These are the empty crysalis (pupae) cases from which the moths emerged...one was male, the other female.

005-4.jpg

This is the female...she has a slightly fatter abdomen, thin antennae, and is slightly bigger than the male. In the second pic, you can see that she's already laid a couple of eggs on the stick that was provided to give them somewhere to expand their wings. The male, slimmer, and with feathered antennae is below.

001-4.jpg

002-2.jpg

Cont.....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In the following pics, you can see why they are called Eyed Hawk moths....when disturbed, they lift the fore wings to reveal a pair of staring 'eyes'. This has the effect of scaring off any predators...especially birds.

This is the female again....

003-2.jpg

She's quite large compared to my fingers...about 4" across the wings...

004-4.jpg

007.jpg

This is the male, again. Hopefully you can make out the feathered antennae, which are much more sensitive than the females. They can detect the pheromone smell of the female from over a mile downwind!

006-2.jpg

Well...that little project has taken a year to come to fruition...both moths have been released back to the wild.

Hope you enjoyed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is the male, again. Hopefully you can make out the feathered antennae, which are much more sensitive than the females. They can detect the pheromone smell of the female from over a mile downwind!

That would come handy on Saturday nights! A lot less wasted time! :lol:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We were at Bempton Cliffs this weekend & there were loads of these wooly bears sunbathing on the fence at the edge of the cloths - anyone know what butterfly/moth they transform into?

:)

IMG_0346-1.jpg

I'm pretty sure that's the caterpillar of the Drinker moth...have a look here

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I noticed some brightly coloured weeds the other day beneath the bird feeder, so I snapped some close-ups, though it was a bit breezy. Anyway, after downloading, I noticed this scary looking thing in a few of the pictures.

weed28a.jpg

weed28.jpg

Later,

William

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looks like a Hover Fly, William....designed/evolved to look like a bee or a wasp, but perfectly harmless. The large fly-like compound eyes give the game away...bees and wasps don't have such large eyes.

Here's a pic of a very large hover fly that I took last year...this ones over an inch long...pretending to be a hornet...but still harmless.

Bugpics001.jpg

Bugpics005.jpg

Edited by Roger the Dodger

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Insects certainly are not an area of expertise for me. :lol: At very most, I'd say it was 15mm long. Here is a clearer picture of it;s... uhhh... abdomen:

weed32a.jpg

Later,

William

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Insects certainly are not an area of expertise for me. :lol: At very most, I'd say it was 15mm long. Here is a clearer picture of it;s... uhhh... abdomen:

I had to google that one as I though abdomen was the belly... apparently you're right, they call it that to that last segment on a insect... Is that so, Roger?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Insects certainly are not an area of expertise for me. :lol: At very most, I'd say it was 15mm long. Here is a clearer picture of it;s... uhhh... abdomen:

I had to google that one as I though abdomen was the belly... apparently you're right, they call it that to that last segment on a insect... Is that so, Roger?

I had to harken back to my childhood teachers to remember. :lol:

Later,

William

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good memory!! I can't even remember half my childhood teachers, let alone insects anatomy... I do remember that the reproduction cycles of plants was an absolute nightmare...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Insects certainly are not an area of expertise for me. :lol: At very most, I'd say it was 15mm long. Here is a clearer picture of it;s... uhhh... abdomen:

I had to google that one as I though abdomen was the belly... apparently you're right, they call it that to that last segment on a insect... Is that so, Roger?

Yep...Insect's bodies are divided into three separate divisions...head, thorax and abdomen. Obviously, the head consists of the main sensory centres...eyes, mouth and mandibles, and one of the most important parts of the anatomy, the antennae. The thorax is the power house of an insect. It is filled with powerful muscles which control the 2 pairs of wings, and 3 pairs of legs. Some insects only have one true pair of wings...crane flies (or daddy longlegs) have the hind pair reduced to a pair of rotating 'clubs' called 'Halterers'...which act like gyroscopic stabilisers...remove them, and the insect can't fly. The abdomen , like ours, contains the digestive system, and the reproductive organs, but it also has another function. The body is divided into segments...usually 13. Each segment is equipped with two 'spiracles', one on each side...openings which connect to the respiratory system which enable the insect to breathe. You may have seen an insect at rest with its abdomen rapidly expanding and contracting...it's actually breathing.

In this pic of a caterpillar about to pupate, you can clearly see the spiracle openings along its body outlined in red.

Bugpics008.jpg

Hope this answers your question, Renato.

Edited by Roger the Dodger

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yep...Insect's bodies are divided into three separate divisions...head, thorax and abdomen. Obviously, the head consists of the main sensory centres...eyes, mouth and mandibles, and one of the most important parts of the anatomy, the antennae. The thorax is the power house of an insect. It is filled with powerful muscles which control the 2 pairs of wings, and 6 pairs of legs. Some insects only have one true pair of wings...crane flies (or daddy longlegs) have the hind pair reduced to a pair of rotating 'clubs' called 'Halterers'...which act like gyroscopic stabilisers...remove them, and the insect can't fly. The abdomen , like ours, contains the digestive system, and the reproductive organs, but it also has another function. The body is divided into segments...usually 13. Each segment is equipped with two 'spiracles', one one on each side...openings which connect to the respiratory system which enable the insect to breathe. You may have seen an insect at rest with its abdomen rapidly expanding and contracting...it's actually breathing.

In this pic of a caterpillar about to pupate, you can clearly see the spiracle openings along its body outlined in red.

Bugpics008.jpg

Hope this answers your question, Renato.

Roger, the film "Starship Troopers" must have drove you crazy. :wink:

Later,

William

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Loved it!...though they should have known about CO2...it will immobilize any insect in seconds. In a previous life before carpentry and gardening, I used to work for ICI in their entomology department, breeding insects for insecticide testing. Every insect, from the smallest fruit fly to the biggest dragonfly, will succumb to unconsciousness in a few seconds with a whiff of pure carbon dioxide...though I suppose that's not great film making...Denise Richards with a big gun..mmmmm.....Sorry...got a bit pervy then... :lol:

Edited by Roger the Dodger

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

About Us

The Watch Forum started in 2001 as a forum for RLT Watches customers. Since then it has grown into a world wide community of watch enthusiasts and a large resource for all types of horology.

Contact Us

Email : admin@thewatchforum.co.uk

Phone: 07762 569 999
×