Omega Co-Axial Movements

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Posted · Report post

Hi,

I'm considering getting another Omega watch and I've seen several with the Co-Axial movement. Whilst I can appreciate that these Co-Axs are a step improvement over 'normal' mechanical movements in that they suffer less friction, I have heard different views from those who already have them. Am I right in thinking that some Co-Axs were/are troublesome - and if so, which ones should I avoid on the secondhand market? Are the newer ones any better?

Thanks in advance for any input.

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Posted (edited) · Report post

Fat fingers and an iPhone not a good combo

Edited by gaz64

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Posted · Report post

I have had no first hand experience of them however a watchmaker I know had a customer who had one which went faulty back it went and a whole new movt was swapped in. Seems according to the watchie that even the service centres find them to difficult to work on

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Posted · Report post

Hi, i can't comment on the earlier models but the new movement, caliber 8500, is THE one to get, other movements were standard ones with the escapment only changed to co-axial, the 8500 is built in house by Omega, they designed it completely around the movement, which they made 12% larger, with everything optimised for efficieny and low friction, all the wheels and gear train have high teeth count to lower friction, the balance spring is made from silicon which does not get affected by shocks and is non magnetic, it has two mainspring barrels which are also jewelled to reduce friction giving a 60 hr power reserve these do not work together, one is wound first, then the second one through differential gearing and the watch has a 4 year warranty and is extremely accurate!! Easily achieving the "Chronometer" award and would walk away with quite a few points if Kew Observatory was still going......

Have a look at www.omega.ch

And no i don't work for Omega...........but i am saving up to buy one, i think they are Gorgeous!!!! :man_in_love::man_in_love: :man_in_love:

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Posted · Report post

ive found them to be very accurate

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Posted (edited) · Report post

My watchman who is an Omega lover and techie informed me the movements are fantastic but soooooo difficult to work on. His advice to me avoid em. I do think he was trying to avoid the work.....

Edited by Philz

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Posted · Report post

I have a co axial movement in my aqua terra, keeps great time.

Had it about a year, no complaints whatsoever and looks stunning IMO.

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Posted · Report post

My seamster GMT has a 2628 movement, which is co-axial.

No problem at all with it, but I've only had it a few months.

I've not heard of any issues with them either.

As has been said the 8500 is THE movement. The silicone balance spring is a huge step forward in horology.

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Posted · Report post

useful link

http://www.omegawatches.com/spirit/watchmaking/co-axial/technology

seems a lot of effort to make something that still isn't as accurate as quartz ;)

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Posted · Report post

Well that's like saying a modern diesel energy efficient car is better than an 1960's E type V12 Jaguar......

They both do the same thing......... one is better and more accurate but the other has a sense of occasion and a soul..... Depends on what you want the watch for.....time keeper, fashion statement, bling accessory, best watch, watch for work, investment, each to their own i guess........ :)

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Posted · Report post

useful link

http://www.omegawatches.com/spirit/watchmaking/co-axial/technology

seems a lot of effort to make something that still isn't as accurate as quartz ;)

You can buy any ol' accurate quartz-powered watch for a hunred bob. But you can't buy a great mechanical movement for that. A good one, sure. Not a great one. Likewise, I doubt you can buy a distinctive, hand-made objet d'art for that ... the artisan had to invest more.

Now, I'm not saying that this is now the best movement on the planet ... there are others, young and old, that rival the co-axial in accuracy, efficacy, economy (some would say others exceed it). I think Omega would have you believe this is the new pinnacle of watchmaking precision, to which I chortle into my coffee cup.

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Posted · Report post

There have certainly been issues with some of the movements and a couple of people posted problems on here but perhaps the problems were few considering the number sold. Looking at the advert in the link though it's possible to get the impression that they actually got the movement sorted from 2007 onwards?....

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Posted · Report post

useful link

http://www.omegawatches.com/spirit/watchmaking/co-axial/technology

seems a lot of effort to make something that still isn't as accurate as quartz ;)

Are you refering to co-ax or the entire mechanical watch making industry?!

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Posted · Report post

I've had a PO (2500 movement) for over about 15 months. Never missed a beat.

Accurate to less than a second a day :thumbsup:

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Posted (edited) · Report post

useful link

http://www.omegawatches.com/spirit/watchmaking/co-axial/technology

seems a lot of effort to make something that still isn't as accurate as quartz ;)

Are you refering to co-ax or the entire mechanical watch making industry?!

I appreciate the engineering that goes into mechanical watches but i'm not sure that co-axial is necessary to make the most accurate mechanical watch. I have a CWC 1970s chronograph re-issue (ETA/Valjoux 7760) that is only a few seconds out per month. It has a lever escapement that hasn't changed much since its invention...

Edited by Andy the Squirrel

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Posted · Report post

I had my Omega Speedmaster 50th Anniversary model with the 3201 movement regulated by Swatch UK and it's been running around +/-1 second per day depending on whether I wind it or leave it.

On the other hand I had my Seamaster Planet Ocean Chronograph regulated a few months ago by Swatch UK and it was running +2 seconds per day consistently. In September they replaced the crystal under warranty and recently it has been losing -8/-10 seconds per day :o It's also just gone 2 days out of warranty so I'm not sure if they are going to charge me to re-regulate it.

If you get a co-axial movement I think you'll find that the timekeeping is much more consistent to many other movements no matter what position it is left in (upside down, crown up, crown down etc).

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Posted · Report post

... If you get a co-axial movement I think you'll find that the timekeeping is much more consistent to many other movements no matter what position it is left in (upside down, crown up, crown down etc).

And there's that bit of charm (about mechanical movements) out the window.

I never thought that the aim of a great mechanical movement was to get accuracy as close to a quartz model as possible. Long life, reliability, artful construction, economy of design, and oh pretty good accuracy (not having to reset it more than once a week suits me fine, and by that I mean +/- 8 seconds is acceptable) are the most I can ask from any mechanical watch. There are so many choices out there that satisfy that punchdown list it's dizzying.

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Posted (edited) · Report post

... If you get a co-axial movement I think you'll find that the timekeeping is much more consistent to many other movements no matter what position it is left in (upside down, crown up, crown down etc).

And there's that bit of charm (about mechanical movements) out the window.

I never thought that the aim of a great mechanical movement was to get accuracy as close to a quartz model as possible. Long life, reliability, artful construction, economy of design, and oh pretty good accuracy (not having to reset it more than once a week suits me fine, and by that I mean +/- 8 seconds is acceptable) are the most I can ask from any mechanical watch. There are so many choices out there that satisfy that punchdown list it's dizzying.

Well that statement is a bit Irish!

The majority of people who have the means to purchase high end watches costing several thousand pounds do not want to monitor the timekeeping on a daily or weekly basis. They're too busy with work, family and life in general to care about such petty things. They'd rather have a reliable watch that keeps good time, and not have to worry about regulating it or moving it around in different positions just so it can gain or lose 0.002 seconds every night.

For the minority that are nerdy fanboys and freeks, ie anyone on here who are enthousiasts without a life (me included), we take more of an interest in things like timekeeping and which animal we need to insert our timepiece into overnight so it gains or looses that 0.002 seconds!

:tease:

Edited by Irfan

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