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Photography Hints And Tips

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PG - Great source of information on photography - thank you for the compilation !!

Have just been looking on your watch site, some very cool shots there - you certainly know your camera !!

I've got a lot to think about before snapping away - but now have a big head start on lighting thanks to you :)

Cheers

TC

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PG - Great source of information on photography - thank you for the compilation !!

Have just been looking on your watch site, some very cool shots there - you certainly know your camera !!

I've got a lot to think about before snapping away - but now have a big head start on lighting thanks to you :)

Cheers

TC

Nice of you to say so but there are quite a few on here who are far better than me!

I hope it's inspired you to have a go though, that's what it's all about.

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PG - Great source of information on photography - thank you for the compilation !!

Have just been looking on your watch site, some very cool shots there - you certainly know your camera !!

I've got a lot to think about before snapping away - but now have a big head start on lighting thanks to you :)

Cheers

TC

Nice of you to say so but there are quite a few on here who are far better than me!

I hope it's inspired you to have a go though, that's what it's all about.

It's certainly done that - this will be my first attempt at photographing my watches, so don't expect miracles ..

The only problem I've found in going to your site, is that by following your "watch sites" link to other watch sites and then following another "watch sites" link from that site I have now discovered another watch that I never knew existed and really feel that I need now !! (a PRS-11DN 300M PVD auto) .. I'm sure there must be a medical term for this obsessive, compulsive interest in watches :D

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For macro or close up shots it's a good idea to select points of focus or the face/case of the watch and use Unsharp Mask.

So the sharpening looks normal, make a selection of the watch using the Lasso tool or even the eclipse tool and select from the menu:

Select > Modify > Feather (Use around 30 and upwards depending on the resolution of the image)

With the selection feathered, choose

Filter > Sharpen > Unsharp Mask. (Generally the settings to use in consecutive order are 75 / 4.0 / 2)

This form of sharpening when you are touching up your images is much for efficient and looks alot less harsher.

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Excellent article. Thanks for this. I can see where I went wrong when I photographed a watch to put on E**y recently.

My 'write up' was good but the pictures weren't. Another guy a few days later had an identical watch with minimum details but superb pictures. He got more for his watch than I got for mine. I think the quality of the pictures probably did it. That and the fact he greatly inflated the original price he claimed he'd paid.

Thanks again.

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Love the up-turned Ikea bin as a means of getting nice, flat light. I find lighting is the biggest problem. I haven't tried very hard to get it right yet, admittedly. This one was taken on the mantel piece in my living room, which has a low voltage spot pointing at it. Keeping my shadow out of the way involved some entertaining gymnastics! ;)

rolex3ay5.jpg

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Hello- I asked a pal who is into photography how best to take a pic of ones watch, his suggestion is---

Obtain from probably a boot sale an old fashioned conical light shade which looks as if it has been sandblasted and looks similar to a flouresant bulb place the watch inside and shine at least two lights onto it the postion the camera lens through the top aperture where the bulb would go, this has the added bonus of resting the camera on something solid. The shade acts as a diffuser.

I have not been able to abtain such an item as yet - if anyone has a shade i would be interested to hear your opinion.

SEISMIC ONE

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Nice idea. Don't know exactly what lampshade you mean but how about...

Ikea £1.99

http://www.ikea.com/gb/en/catalog/products/00080313

Hi Robert i to am an Ayrshire lad. but much older i remember the shade i am talking about being in the school they measured app. 8 inches across 6 inches tall the the aperture at the top narrowed to 2.5 inches. i will popinto Ikea and have a look.

The main advantage of the one i am thinking of was its ability to let through the maximum amount of light.--- It was made of glass.

SEISMIC ONE

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If any of you struggle with lighting, especially if you use off camera flash then www.strobist.blogspot.com may be worth a look. There's some really useful tutorials and stuff right from the basics, although it's much better if you shoot Nikon rather than Canon (like me...!).

Anyway, hope it helps!

Henry

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I'm going to try one of those parasols that clip onto a pram or trolley.

I feel that a black one would get rid of some of those light reflections I get from overhead windows.

All I need now is a quilted jacket and a smoking hat.............oh and a cigarette holder.

My photography kit now looks like Steptoes living room......... :lol:

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potn forums, canon digital photography fourms. i just got a link to it, in the marco forum there is a video of a guy with a homemade one he explains it all, i dunno what he is on about as i have no sound on my lappy.

Edited by brgkster

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Great site, should have read it before my first and very poor attempt at watch photography earlier.

Thanks Gary

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Guest Om_nom_nom_Watches!

Best easy tip for good watch pics: GO OUTSIDE! :)

...Natural light is your best friend.

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great tips.been pulling my hair out{what bit i`ve got left] all week trying thus that and the other.thanks

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just want to say thanks to pg.learnt a lot this afternoon just reading the forum.stuck at home at moment nursing mrs. so have had time on my hands.thanks again

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hey all

one or two additions....

north facing rooms are best if you are using natural light...

use a small aperture ( f5.6 - 8) but if you're using digital don't go beyond this as it will decrease overall sharpness...

shoot in raw and apply usm through a mask ( try an inverse of the red channel to begin with)

usm settings depend on the size of the image being sharpened so don't use a formulaic trio based on someone elses experience

always evaluate sharpness while viewing at 100%

use a prime lens

use a circular polarising filter

lighting tents aren't as expensive as you think ~ £30 new

if you are using canon don't use 50 iso... if you can use 160 if not use 100

if you are shooting in a light tent spot meter for the watch dial... if you use evaluative metering it will underexpose the shot

the reverse is true if you shoot against black velvet!!

jb

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use a small aperture ( f5.6 - 8) but if you're using digital don't go beyond this as it will decrease overall sharpness...

That will depend on the focal length of the lens and its aperture range, F5.6 to 8 might be optimal for a fast standard lens but not for longer (much slower) or shorter focal lengths (also often slower than a standard prime lens).

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use a small aperture ( f5.6 - 8) but if you're using digital don't go beyond this as it will decrease overall sharpness...

That will depend on the focal length of the lens and its aperture range, F5.6 to 8 might be optimal for a fast standard lens but not for longer (much slower) or shorter focal lengths (also often slower than a standard prime lens).

well I doubt anyone will be using a wide angle to take photos of a watch, and the slowest most lenses get is 5.6, so f8 will still be an optimal setting for most of these lenses too....

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use a small aperture ( f5.6 - 8) but if you're using digital don't go beyond this as it will decrease overall sharpness...

That will depend on the focal length of the lens and its aperture range, F5.6 to 8 might be optimal for a fast standard lens but not for longer (much slower) or shorter focal lengths (also often slower than a standard prime lens).

well I doubt anyone will be using a wide angle to take photos of a watch, and the slowest most lenses get is 5.6, so f8 will still be an optimal setting for most of these lenses too....

a standard fast lens will be very sharp from f/2.8, and most good zoom lenses are pretty sharp wide open, once you go beyond f/8 diffraction counteracts any sharpness benefits. For a "perfect" lens which no one has yet made, the ability of a lens to resolve in lines per mm changes as follows, for real lenses the effects are far greater....

5.6 283

8 200

11 141

so the payoff for extra depth of field for going beyond f/8 is not terribly useful for the overall sharpness of your picture, regardless of what type of lens you are using.

I still say stick to f/5.6 to f/8!!

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