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TinkerPhil

3 Pocket Watches in need of identification...

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Hi

These are the three pocket watches my wife inherited - lovingly wrapped in toilet paper in a cigar box :-)

Willian Egan & Sons Cork

WilliamEganFace.JPG

WilliamEganBack.JPG

WilliamEganInside.JPG

Inside reads "William Egan & Sons Ltd" Cork "SWISS MADE" M 1934171 and surrounded by a box: 0,935

 

Joseph et Fils GENEVE

JosephEtFilsFace.JPG

JosephEtFilsBack.JPG

JosephEtFilsInside.JPG

 

Omega (no other text or numbers visible)

OmegaFace.JPG

OmegaBack.JPG

Any opinions or advice gratefully appreciated

Phil

 

 

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The first two appear to be silver, possibly a hallmark inside the back of the second though it isn't clear from the photo (would narrow down a date but being key wound it is likely pre WW1/victorian)

The third obviously has a good brand name.

These are better quality than the wrist watches you posted but since pocket watches are unfashionable they aren't the easiest things to sell. 

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4 hours ago, Daveyboyz said:

The first two appear to be silver, possibly a hallmark inside the back of the second though it isn't clear from the photo (would narrow down a date but being key wound it is likely pre WW1/victorian)

The third obviously has a good brand name.

These are better quality than the wrist watches you posted but since pocket watches are unfashionable they aren't the easiest things to sell. 

Thanks for that - as I suspected no real great worth - I'm not sure what will happen to them now - probably just go back into "toilet paper storage" :-)

The key wound watch says "FINE SILVER" and "5 9 8 9 1" - the number is not well formatted each number jumping up and down.  There are some extremely feint marking which might be a hallmark but I'd have expected a hallmark to be more prominent.  The other looks like it might have a lion in a shield (very small - maybe 3mm high - and "7" and "C" at 7 and 5 O'clock below it and a small "2" directly below the shield but below the "7" and "C"

Another poster suggested I mend them myself - I never thought of myself as a watch repairer - is this something I could/should consider - obviously just for fun?

The Omega seems to have no way to open it - is this just a matter of wedging something into the obvious groove and prising it apart - or are there any magic incantations or secret points I need to know?

Thanks again

Phil

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I replied on your watches about sentimental value. I am only an Amateur on watch/clock fixing, but i do like the challenge. But read up on it and photograph regularly so you remember where each bit goes at least to start with. some cases pop off some unscrew.

Whatever you decide be careful its part of your wife's history

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8 minutes ago, stdape said:

I replied on your watches about sentimental value. I am only an Amateur on watch/clock fixing, but i do like the challenge. But read up on it and photograph regularly so you remember where each bit goes at least to start with. some cases pop off some unscrew.

Whatever you decide be careful its part of your wife's history

Agreed, careful for sure! If she only knew if the watches were special or not! We can't even be sure they weren't junk her father found somewhere :-(

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The Omega is, well... an Omega, and is later in date by a fair few years than the other two watches, in a simple style redolent of a more modern period than your other two watches on this thread. However, given the sparsity of information about it, I cannot date it precisely.

William Egan & Sons Ltd, Cork, will have been the (Irish) retailer of your watch so named, which appears to be silver. In fact the Egan firm of jewellers and silversmiths were an important fixture in Cork for a very long period, starting when the firm was founded in the 1820s in the Grand Parade. In 1875, the firm moved to Saint Patrick's Street, and remained there for no less than 110 years. Over that time, the company shop was destroyed during the burning of Cork in 1920, but a brand new premises was built and used by Egan's from 1925. The business closed in 1986, after a long and distinguished history in Cork. Your Egan watch turn of the twentieth century, and a more accurate date might be provided either by any hallmarks or by the exact designation of the company - i.e. the company title as it appears on the dial.

Your Joseph & Fils pocket watch is the most difficult to trace in terms of its maker/retailer, and it is also the earliest of the three watches. I would hope that, if it is silver, it will bear some sort of dateable hallmark but without this to guide me, I would plump for a date of about 1885 for that watch. I have not been able to trace Joseph & Fils, Geneve, but a watch from the same location gives Joseph an initial, "J" for his first name.

 

 

 

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I opened up the Joseph and Sons watch a bit more but still could not find a hallmark.  The inner cover had the same number stamped on it.

When I flicked the small wheel with the very fine spring on it the watch started ticking and has run smoothly now for nearly 30 minutes.

The bar that holds the top of that wheel in place was very ornate but, as I said no further hallmarks or other IDs

One of the bars had "J.JOSEPH & SONS" on it along with "GENEVA" which seems to tally with your observation

Emboldened I did the same with the Egan - but found no more marks in that one either - at least it is ticking now

The Omega is ticking ok too - I'm somewhat surprised as I doubt any of them have been working for 20+ years!

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