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heard from a friend of a friend of a friend of a watch repairer , that if you put lighter fluid in a cup etc and put a vintage watch over the top once the back is removed , the fumes from the lighter fluid lubricates the mechanism in manual wind watches  ( it apparently frees and degreases them )  cant vouch for if it works but it sounds logical , maybe worth trying on a none running under £50 piece to try out   regards

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7 minutes ago, craig12 said:

heard from a friend of a friend of a friend of a watch repairer , that if you put lighter fluid in a cup etc and put a vintage watch over the top once the back is removed , the fumes from the lighter fluid lubricates the mechanism in manual wind watches  ( it apparently frees and degreases them )  cant vouch for if it works but it sounds logical , maybe worth trying on a none running under £50 piece to try out   regards

Old trick in days gone by was to suspend pocket watches with the case back off over a tin of meths. It's only a short term "fix" though.

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I do love lighter fluid. It has so many uses that I always keep a tin of the stuff handy, and I do like the push-down spout on the cans.

I have certainly never come across the idea of lubricating a watch in the way you describe, dear Craig, but I am not surprised that it might work. It would certainly help me, because I am so clumsy with my hands these days that a way of lubricating a mechanical movement without running the risk of overdoing it or causing damage would be a boon.

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I wonder what effect that would have on the dial and hands? 

With the exception of the escape wheel, the teeth of the gears in a watch are not usually lubricated. Sounds like a bad idea to me.  

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Before the advent of Goo Gone(TM) I used to use lighter fluid to remove adhesives ... but it would leave some residue on some materials. I would presume lighter fluid would be terminally bad for dial markings, lume, etc. In general this "tip" seems ill advised and foolish,... and that's being generous. 

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Generally, if an idea seems to be too easy or too good to be true, then it usually is....

I too would be concerned about what it might do to the dial, lume etc... :huh:

Edited by Roddyjb

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Better to wear the non runner and let you body temperature warm the old oil.  If it starts ticking you still need to service it, but servicing a watch that ticks with help is better than stripping a watch to find an impossible to find component is broken.

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An old handkerchief can be soaked in WD40 and suspended by a drawing pin inside a longcase clock to lubricate it.....mmmmm

mike

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My old watch maker retired now but still fixes the odd bit used to dip the complete movement i once saw him dip a complete movement with dial and hands into some solution think it was called petrol ether or something it used to bring them back to life and the dirt that used to come off the movements wow ...

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I have an old watchmaker's book that recommends lighter fuel as a solvent to clean a balance spring but no mention of other lighter fuel trickery!

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Many many years ago, Benzine was used as a degreasing liquid to clean watch movements. It was found to cause cancer so was banned. For decades now a product called Albion Essence has been used to degrease components, such as the balance and spring. Lighter fluid is a very refined petrochemical product and ideal for degreasing watch parts. It isn't  used by watchmakers as a cleaning fluid.

 

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On 11/03/2018 at 17:15, Always"watching" said:

I do love lighter fluid. It has so many uses that I always keep a tin of the stuff handy, and I do like the push-down spout on the cans.

I have certainly never come across the idea of lubricating a watch in the way you describe, dear Craig, but I am not surprised that it might work. It would certainly help me, because I am so clumsy with my hands these days that a way of lubricating a mechanical movement without running the risk of overdoing it or causing damage would be a boon.

I know you won't take this as anything more than the joke it's meant to be, Honour, but, mate, you need to get out more........:laughing2dw:

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On 11/03/2018 at 19:04, dobra said:

An old handkerchief can be soaked in WD40 and suspended by a drawing pin inside a longcase clock to lubricate it.....mmmmm

mike

NO, NO, NO!

JUST NO!

WD40 is a great product as long as it is kept a mile or so from most if not all things horological! But there is nothing worse than opening a watch or clock to smell the WD40 - - a long task ahead cleaning and re-cleaning and then eventually re-lubing correctly.

WD40 and similar are basically penetrating oils. They are designed to "creep" between parts to assist in removal or freeing off, and not as lubricants. A short term fix for your front door hnges perhaps, but not much more.

JUST NO!

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Haven't done it Mel,, read it in an old book. Another "tip" was to put a clock movement in a washing up bowl and dribble washing up liquid over it, followed by a kettle full of boiling water. Stick movement on hot radiator to dry, then lubricate.........

Edited by dobra

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22 minutes ago, dobra said:

Haven't done it Mel,, read it in an old book. Another "tip" was to put a clock movement in a washing up bowl and dribble washing up liquid over it, followed by a kettle full of boiling water. Stick movement on hot radiator to dry, then lubricate.........

That stands a much better chance of working than the WD40 thing - - and is almost an early "swish dunk" method. :yes:

This is no substitute mind you, for a full strip, clean, inspection  and a thorough oil all over - - (am I on the horographical site or the pornograpic one, at my age it's hard to remember? ) :whistle:

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Couldnt you just stick a clock movement in the tumble drier.  It gets all the fluff out of my clothes so it would probably clear the fluff out of clockwork.

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On ‎3‎/‎18‎/‎2018 at 04:51, mel said:

NO, NO, NO!

JUST NO!

WD40 is a great product as long as it is kept a mile or so from most if not all things horological! But there is nothing worse than opening a watch or clock to smell the WD40 - - a long task ahead cleaning and re-cleaning and then eventually re-lubing correctly.

WD40 and similar are basically penetrating oils. They are designed to "creep" between parts to assist in removal or freeing off, and not as lubricants. A short term fix for your front door hnges perhaps, but not much more.

JUST NO!

     Good God   NO ! 

 

 

 

 

     

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

g

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