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I didn'y know this...but... like Aviator straps, Bund straps were also invented for German pilots in World War II, albeit for a slightly different reason.

The single largest hazard in the event of a plane crash is the ensuing fire, and anything composed primarily of metal would quickly become hot. Very hot. Watches are always in direct contact with the skin, so a standard strap would allow the watch to scald the wrist. Bund straps, on the other hand, are constructed with an extra layer of padding beneath the back of the case, therefore preventing it from burning the wearer.

This was also useful in high altitudes where the temperature would drop dramatically, since the extra layer of leather would prohibit the metal from freezing to the skin. One final use of the Bund strap was its ability to absorb perspiration; early watches were not very water resistant, so sweat could easily enter through the case back.

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On 11/10/2017 at 13:22, relaxer7 said:

I didn'y know this...but... like Aviator straps, Bund straps were also invented for German pilots in World War II, albeit for a slightly different reason.

The single largest hazard in the event of a plane crash is the ensuing fire, and anything composed primarily of metal would quickly become hot. Very hot. Watches are always in direct contact with the skin, so a standard strap would allow the watch to scald the wrist. Bund straps, on the other hand, are constructed with an extra layer of padding beneath the back of the case, therefore preventing it from burning the wearer.

This was also useful in high altitudes where the temperature would drop dramatically, since the extra layer of leather would prohibit the metal from freezing to the skin. One final use of the Bund strap was its ability to absorb perspiration; early watches were not very water resistant, so sweat could easily enter through the case back.

Interesting read, thanks, perhaps the Germans had a bit of influence from WW1 ?

shipwreck-watch-straps1.gif

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