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Seb1982

Winding query

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This is probably a stupid question, and so I apologise in advance.  But ...

Say a mechanical watch had a 40 hour power reserve on a single wind.  Would it be OK to continually fully wind it up every night, and just let it run down however much it does during the day each and every day, winding it back up from half wound to fully wound every night ... or .... does it do them good to let them run completely down occasionally? 

I guess I'm wondering whether the mainspring benefits from being properly "exercised" as it was designed to do, or whether I'm overthinking things!

Thank you!

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I've always fully wound hand wind watches but always had times when for whatever reason I didn't wear the watch. I've never had a problem with doing that.

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They are designed to be wound every day at the same time even if they have more gas left in the tank.

I see the logic about exercising the spring but its all within function so don't worry.

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Can't see a part wind doing much harm :)

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I don't think that winding them from half wound to full on a regular basis will harm them at all.

From a mechanical point of view, putting stress on a metal will only permanently deform it if the stress pushes it past its "elastic limit".  Keep the stress below this limit and the metal will bounce back to its original size and shape.  Steel has a particularly high limit, spring steels especially so, hence their uses in these applications. In other words, you can put a bigger force on them, they will bend further, store more energy in them as they bend, but release this energy and return back to their original shape better than other materials.

As long as the spring in your watch has been designed to be well below its elastic limit when fully wound then regular winding from half to full will not do it any harm at all.

J

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I am no expert, but I've heard that watches run at their most accurate when the main spring is fully wound. It is supposed to have something to do with the watch working at optimum levels when the torque received from the main spring is at maximum torque, so keeping the watch wound fully and not letting the main spring unwind excessively will keep the watch working at its best. That could be total BS so I stand to be corrected.

Wear and longevity of doing this is a different matter, I guess, but I am sure much more knowledgeable people will be along to advise.

In practical terms, I suspect there would be little difference, but I suspect that a daily or even twice daily wind (depending on power reserve) would keep the watch working efficiently and not cause problems.

As a non-expert in all things mechanical, I try to consider my mechanical devices be they motor vehicles or my watches with mechanical sympathy and try to keep them working through their working parameters to keep them functioning well.

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My granddad used to wind his pocket watch first thing in the morning and last hing before bed ...
Friend of mine bought automatic winders for all his watches. 

And I prefer to wind the one that will be on my wrist that day so we make connection sort of speak :yes:
 

No right or wrong there, just find your way!
 

13 minutes ago, Ullevi said:

expert, but I've heard that watches run at their most accurate when the main spring is fully wound. It is supposed to have something to do with the watch working at optimum levels when the torque received from the main spring is at maximum torque, so keeping the watch wound fully and not letting the main spring unwind excessively will keep the watch working at its best.

I know that as well but never actually tested it :thumbsup:

Edited by Velizark0
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13 minutes ago, Ullevi said:

 

I am no expert, but I've heard that watches run at their most accurate when the main spring is fully wound. It is supposed to have something to do with the watch working at optimum levels when the torque received from the main spring is at maximum torque, so keeping the watch wound fully and not letting the main spring unwind excessively will keep the watch working at its best. That could be total BS so I stand to be corrected.

 

I heard between 80% to 20%.

One of the reasons for double barrelled is not only longer reserve but so they can be wound looser.  

A fully wound spring pushes hardest and unwound doesn't push so hard but between 20% to 80% it pushes most consistantly.

Watchmakers have been working tirelessly to try and counter this phenomenon with the high end Grubel8ns and the like having complex differencials and all sorts in an effort to have a steady state of power release.

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Sorry for disappearing for a few hours, there - I was on the road.

Lots of really good advice and starting points for further research as ever - thank you ever so much, guys :)

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